Migrants, Refugees, and Foreign Policy: U.S. and German Policies toward Countries of Origin

By Rainer Münz | Go to book overview

Chapter 4
German Policies Toward Ethnic German Minorities

Volker Ronge

T he influx to Germany of ethnic Germans from Eastern Europe and the countries of the former Soviet Union (FSU) has always been regarded as a special case by German policymakers in comparison to other types of immigration. The conditions for ethnic German immigration are specified in Germany's underlying legal framework, most notably Article 116 of the Federal Republic's postwar constitution. Yet the laws that regulate the applications, allowances, and entry of ethnic German immigrants, as well as measures of social aid and integration aimed at such immigrants, should not be interpreted as forerunners of a general "immigration law," although they may eventually serve as a model for future law. The particularity of ethnic German immigration to Germany is reinforced by relatively positive attitudes on the part of the indigenous population toward an influx of seemingly "similar" people. Only recently, with the fall of the iron curtain, has ethnic German migration come into question because of the fear of the large number of entrants to come.

The following cornerstones form the basis for interpreting the "special case" of ethnic German immigration from Eastern Europe and FSU countries:

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Migrants, Refugees, and Foreign Policy: U.S. and German Policies toward Countries of Origin
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Chapter 1 the Impact of German Policy on Refugee Flows from Former Yugoslavia 1
  • Notes 27
  • References 30
  • Chapter 2 the Impact of U.S. Policy on Migration from Mexico and the Caribbean 35
  • Notes 71
  • References 72
  • Chapter 3 Migration in the Russian Federation Since the Mid-1980s Refugees, Immigrants, and Emigrants 77
  • Summary and Conclusions 108
  • Notes 109
  • References 111
  • Chapter 4 German Policies Toward Ethnic German Minorities 117
  • References 140
  • Chapter 5 German Policies Toward Russia and Other Successor States 141
  • Conclusion 159
  • Notes 162
  • References 163
  • Chapter 6 the New Labor Migration as an Instrument of German Foreign Policy 165
  • References 178
  • Chapter 7 Bad Neighbors, Bad Neighborhoods an Inquiry into the Causes of Refugee Flows, 1969-1992 183
  • Conclusion 224
  • Notes 225
  • References 227
  • Chapter 8 Economic Instruments to Affect Countries of Origin 231
  • Conclusions 261
  • Notes 265
  • References 269
  • Chapter 9 Can Military Intervention Limit Refugee Flows? 273
  • Conclusion 309
  • Notes 313
  • References 319
  • Chapter 10 Conclusion - Policies to Reduce Refugee Flows and Pressures for Emigration 323
  • Conclusion 353
  • Notes 355
  • Notes on Contributors 357
  • Index 363
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