An Analysis of the Kinsey Reports on Sexual Behavior in the Human Male and Female

By Donald Porter Geddes | Go to book overview

Portrayers of human weakness


"I AM CONCERNED..."

Millicent C. Mclntosh, Ph.D.

MILLICENT CAREY MCINTOSH, president of Barnard College, Columbia University, is a leader in the field of women's education. At Barnard, Mrs. McIntosh has been most interested in bridging the gap between learning and living, which she feels to be the chief responsibility of a college education, and in helping to remove the obstacles in the way of college­educated women who wish to combine motherhood with a career.

Mrs. McIntosh herself is a unique example of a remarkable combination of marriage and a career, for in private life she is the wife of Dr. Rustin McIntosh, Carpentier Professor of Diseases of Children at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, and Director of Pediatrics at Presbyterian Hospital. They have been married for thirty-two years and have a daughter and four sons; their eldest sons, who are twins, are now at Harvard.

Mrs. McIntosh went to Barnard as Dean in 1947 from the Brearley School in New York City, where she was headmistress for seventeen years. Born in Baltimore, one of six children of a Quaker family, she took her doctorate in English at Johns Hopkins, taught English at Bryn Mawr, and was also acting Dean of that college. She has been honored with a number of honorary degrees and other awards. In 1948 she was awarded the Roosevelt Medal for leadership of youth and development of character, and in 1949, the Hundred Year Association Medal for "outstanding achievement in the interests of the City of New York, particularly in the field of education."

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An Analysis of the Kinsey Reports on Sexual Behavior in the Human Male and Female
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Incisive Comment 1
  • Title Page 3
  • Table of Contents 7
  • Introduction 11
  • Part One - Sixteen Authorities Evaluate the Kinsey Report on Women 31
  • A Source of Error Atomism of Behavior 32
  • So Noble an Effort Corrupted 41
  • The Three Human Females 49
  • Kinsey and the Moral Problem of Man's Sexual Life 62
  • Education about Sex Changing Motives and Methods 71
  • The Scientific Method 91
  • Conclusion 116
  • A Most Important Book, But... 118
  • Implications for Marriage and Sexual Adjustment 130
  • I Am Concerned... 138
  • Dr. Kinsey's Summum Bonum 143
  • One Family's View 154
  • Sexual Behavior in the Young Human Female and Male 165
  • Sex and the Female Character 171
  • The Reading of Kinsey as a Meaningful Experience 183
  • The Marquis de Sade and the First Psychopathia Sexualis 193
  • The Kinsey Report 212
  • Altruism 230
  • Reactions to the Male Volume 261
  • Bibliography 276
  • The 20th of August 285
  • Analyses of the First Four Important Reviews of the Female Volume 297
  • Epilogue 304
  • Index 313
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