An Analysis of the Kinsey Reports on Sexual Behavior in the Human Male and Female

By Donald Porter Geddes | Go to book overview

problem of acquiring a sense of responsibility in a sexual relationship, according to this reviewer.

But "the authors have made bold and important beginnings in their two published books," Professor Cantril concluded. "If in their further studies they can shed light on the significance of the sexual behavior of men and women as human beings endowed with the capacity to experience love, devotion, sacrifice, choice, responsibility, guilt, anxiety and frustration...then they will truly be on their way to contributions of even greater social and scientific importance."


EPILOGUE

During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, a period ending only two and a half centuries ago, the intellectual world was ravaged by conflict. Christian doctrines were being challenged -- not because the challengers were suddenly becoming anti-Christian, but because their inklings of understandings of Nature were contrary to the explanations of the universe that had been woven into Christian doctrine. The staunch defenders of Christianity interpreted all discoveries as attacks, and most of the discoverers were therefore labelled as heretics, or as meddlers with controversial subjects.

The period was not one of individuals in conflict so much as it was one of systems in conflict. These two systems were the old revelation-scheme of Genesis, married to Aristotle, and the new understanding that was being born of science. This conflict, and the ideas and the individuals involved, has been recorded in a most scholarly and authoritative way by Katharine Brownell Collier, in a dissertation published by Columbia University Press in 1934. Dr. Collier's study of systems, that is, ideas in conflict, may seem remote and farfetched in relation to Kinsey and sexual behavior in human males and females, and it would be, except for one thing. The conflict of systems that took place in the 17th and 18th centuries was a conflict between methods of thinking. Christian doctrine had been built upon the old and traditional way, but the new system was built upon science -- a new and revolutionary way of thinking.

As a matter of fact, the new way of thinking grew out of the old way. Many fervent theological philosophers participated in the building of science. Scholasticism itself, with so much meticulous care paid to ratiocination, promoted the scepticism, the curiosity, the experimentation that finally

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An Analysis of the Kinsey Reports on Sexual Behavior in the Human Male and Female
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Incisive Comment 1
  • Title Page 3
  • Table of Contents 7
  • Introduction 11
  • Part One - Sixteen Authorities Evaluate the Kinsey Report on Women 31
  • A Source of Error Atomism of Behavior 32
  • So Noble an Effort Corrupted 41
  • The Three Human Females 49
  • Kinsey and the Moral Problem of Man's Sexual Life 62
  • Education about Sex Changing Motives and Methods 71
  • The Scientific Method 91
  • Conclusion 116
  • A Most Important Book, But... 118
  • Implications for Marriage and Sexual Adjustment 130
  • I Am Concerned... 138
  • Dr. Kinsey's Summum Bonum 143
  • One Family's View 154
  • Sexual Behavior in the Young Human Female and Male 165
  • Sex and the Female Character 171
  • The Reading of Kinsey as a Meaningful Experience 183
  • The Marquis de Sade and the First Psychopathia Sexualis 193
  • The Kinsey Report 212
  • Altruism 230
  • Reactions to the Male Volume 261
  • Bibliography 276
  • The 20th of August 285
  • Analyses of the First Four Important Reviews of the Female Volume 297
  • Epilogue 304
  • Index 313
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