Cultures of Vision: Images, Media, and the Imaginary

By Ron Burnett | Go to book overview

6
Postmodern Media Communities

A Community of Identities

I recently received a superb essay from a student of mine on the history and development of community radio in Canada. He argued for community radio as a tool of liberation, unfettered by the requirements of visual representation, not constrained by the centralized control of modern media monopolies. He talked about participation, about the opening up of a personal space for discourses that are fundamentally oppositional and guided by a sense of alternativity. "An alternative is another. In the sense of alternative media, alternative is perhaps the others. In the sense of community-oriented radio, it is the alternative to rigid formatting, highly packaged, regurgitated information, the search for profit and slickness at the expense of content and social responsibility. It is the 'other': the blacks, the women, the gay men, the prisoners, the adolescents, the community centres, the hispanics, the lesbians, and the children. It isn't just things about them, 'for' them it is by them, and of them."1

As we have seen in Chapter 5, this important concept meaning recovered and then transformed by political and cultural activity is being found at the margins of an increasing number of social and political configurations. There is a close yet ambiguous link between all of these activities and the growth and development of new technologies. From lowcasting to camcorders, from electronic publishing to facsimile machines, we have entered an era in which the way information is transmitted is of less consequence than the use made of the material created. This proliferation, however, carries with it a number of dangers, not the least of which is an overinvestment in the effects of new technologies, an overestimation of the changes produced through the circulation of ideas within the context of the media and the public sphere. I would characterize this latter problem as an effort to construct a utopian ideology on the rather slippery foundation of communication and exchange. The slippages are

____________________
1
Ian Pringle, Active Culturalism Cultural Activism:The Advent of Community-Oriented Institutional FM Broadcasting in Canada, ( Unpublished essay, McGill Universiry, 1991), 8.

-278-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cultures of Vision: Images, Media, and the Imaginary
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 355

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.