Labor Politics in a Democratic Republic: Moderation, Division, and Disruption in the Presidential Election of 1928

By Vaughn Davis Bornet | Go to book overview
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Chapter 7
Hoover Appeals To The Laboring Man

ONE CAN HARDLY ACCOUNT for the nomination and election of Republican candidate Herbert C. Hoover in 1928 on the basis of the antagonistic and partisan treatment he has often received in accounts written since that time. We are told, "Leaders like Herbert Hoover had not, by their personal life, been attuned to the wants of inconspicuous people. . . ." Here was "a member of the managerial class" unacquainted with the "daily yearnings of ordinary humankind."1 Another volume found little good to say about the man elected overwhelmingly in 1928, except that he was a rich and successful man, a good organizer, and a friend of business with a passion for facts.2 Yet another book, on the other hand, found him to be a man with "a vivid record as a humanitarian" who actually "assumed office amid the warm plaudits of his countrymen who hailed him as a brilliant liberal who had earned his position by his distinguished humanitarian and administrative services for over fifteen years."3 Can this be the same person? It is admitted

____________________
1
Ray Allen Billington, Bert James Loewenberg, and Samuel Hugh Brockunier, The United States: American Democracy in World Perspective ( New York, 1947), p. 648.
2
Oscar Theodore Barck, Jr., and Nelson Manfred Blake, Since 1900: A History of the United States in Our Times ( New York, 1947), p. 427.
3
Harvey Wish, Contemporary America: The National Scene Since 1900 ( New York, 1945), p. 411-412.

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