PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITION

When my Courts and Judges: An Introduction to the Judicial Process appeared in 1959, I began its Preface by pointing to the general absence of even the most rudimentary knowledge of the judicial process on the part of the vast majority of students of Political Science entering elementary or even advanced courses, and observed that equally striking was the unavailability of accessible materials providing basic data in the field. The measure of success my small book has enjoyed encouraged the writing of the present volume, which is far more ambitious in scope than its predecessor.

This new book is a selective comparative introduction to the judicial process, and seeks to analyze and evaluate the main institutions and considerations affecting the administration of justice under law. The rather extensive coverage of certain significant features and elements of comparative judicial processes was prompted not only by several helpful suggestions by users of the earlier book, but by the continued neglect of these processes in basic textbooks.

An important segment of this work is thus devoted to the judicial process in England and Wales, and France, and -- to a necessarily considerably lesser extent in this context -- the Soviet Union. Other states are included whenever appropriate, especially in connection with the doctrine and practice of judicial review. Nonetheless, at least half of the material deals with the judicial process in the United States.

The detailed Table of Contents obviates capsule explanations of the substance of each chapter in this volume. I have compiled

-ix-

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