Thirty-Two Stories

By Edgar Allan Poe; Stuart Levine et al. | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY
The system of citation used in the headnotes and footnotes was designed to provide full bibliographical information without being cumbersome. When we wish to express indebtedness to another scholar, we put the person's name in parentheses immediately following the information which his or her work elucidates. Such names appear again here with full citations.To identify works of scholars who wrote more than one item on our list, we have used a numbering system. Thus "(Pollin 7)" or "(Whipple 2)" in the text refer to the seventh item listed under Burton Pollin's name or the second under William Whipple's in the Bibliography.The pecularities of Poe's fiction are behind this system. Poe wrote about solving difficult puzzles, but his stories are the most complex puzzles he ever conceived. The tangled and interwoven lines of association which run through them, and the thousands of allusions to contemporaries, historical figures, and literary works--many of them obscure--often affect meaning. Sometimes annotation enriches a story, giving it resonance the reader would otherwise miss. Sometimes it is absolutely essential; without it the reader has no way of determining what Poe is talking about. Most of the sleuthing involved in explication requires highly specialized knowledge. Wherever we could find help in the work of other scholars, we made use of it, and strongly feel that this debt should be acknowledged. Hence our system of citations, which we hope colleagues and readers find acceptable, ethical, and useful.Included below also are a few works which Poe used frequently as idea-mines in his stories. We include them to identify the editions we used in tracking down his sources. There is a more comprehensive separate list in Levine (4). Finally, we have added listings of good recent works on Poe published since we completed our introduction and annotations.Those works on this list which are of general interest to the nonspecialist reader are marked with an asterisk (*). More technical items which we used in locating Poe's references, allusions, and quotations are also included.
Allen, Hervey. Israfel: The Life and Times of Edgar Allan Poe. 2 vols. New York, 1926. An informative older work, but read A. H. Quinn first.
* Allen, Michael. Poe and the British Magazine Tradition. New York, 1969. On Poe's intellectual environment.
Bandy, W. T. "Little Latin and Less French," Poe Studies, XIV ( June 1981), 8.
Barzun, Jacques. "A Note on the Inadequacy of Poe as a Proofreader and of his Editors as French Scholars," Romantic Review, LXI ( February 1970), 23-27.
Basler, Roy. "Byronism in Poe's 'To One in Paradise,'" American Literature, IX ( May 1937), 232-36.
Benson, Adolph B. "Scandinavian References in the Works of Poe," Journal of English and Germanic Philology, XL ( January 1941), 73-90.
Benton, Richard P. (1) "Is Poe's 'The Assignation' a Hoax?" Nineteenth Century Fiction, XVIII ( September 1963), 193-97.
-----.(2) "Poe's 'The System of Dr. Tarr and Prof. Fether': Dickens or Willis?" Poe Newsletter, I ( April 1968), 7-9.

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