The Two Constitutions: A Comparative Study of British and American Constitutional Systems

By Harold Stannard | Go to book overview

III
PARLIAMENT AND CONGRESS

THE Saxon Kings of England showed their regard for the maxim that government is by the consent of the governed by surrounding themselves with a body of councillors, the wise men or Witan, drawn from the leading personages in their realm. Consultation of the common people was out of the question at so early a stage of political development. It was on the legal side that the common people first participated in the business of government. The average Englishman is quite right in regarding trial by jury as among his fundamental rights. The origins of the jury are uncertain. Probably it goes back to Charlemagne; certainly it had been established in England for centuries before Henry II regularised and amplified the country's judicial system. Respect for the law, which in the first instance meant no more than insistence upon custom, is among the oldest of English traditions, and the Royal officer to whom was entrusted the local maintenance of the King's peace based on law was the shire reeve, or sheriff, who presided over the County Court. The original jurymen were witnesses before him, and witnesses not as to facts but as to character.

-73-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Two Constitutions: A Comparative Study of British and American Constitutional Systems
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Biographical Note viii
  • Introduction ix
  • I- Crown and Constitution 1
  • II- King, President, Prime Minister 55
  • III- Parliament and Congress 73
  • VI- Parties 89
  • V- Senate and House of Lords 112
  • VI- Commons and Representatives 133
  • VII- The Law of the Land 152
  • VIII- The Two Examples 167
  • Selected Bibliography 203
  • Index 205
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 210

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.