Relations between the Federal and State Courts

By Mitchell Wendell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER, XIII
PRESENT PROBLEMS AND HISTORIC CONCEPTS

IN most cases courts apply the law of their own jurisdiction. As integral parts of the governments to which they belong the enforcement of domestic law is their plain duty. Moreover, as a practical matter, legal disputes are likely to be taken to tribunals near a party's residence or place of business, thus making the relevance of domestic law highly probable. There are, however, a large number of situations wherein good sense suggests that it is desirable for courts to look to the laws of a jurisdiction other than their own. Although they present by no means the only opportunities for the enforcement of foreign law, disputes arising from the flow of international trade give courts their most frequent occasions for its application. By their very nature such cases arise out of transactions partly located in each of two or more separate countries. Almost all the world's judicial systems deal with such cases and so give some effect to the laws of foreign countries. Because of its federal structure, the United States spawns an unusually large number of these "international" situations. The national government and all of the states are distinct though partial sovereigns. Consequently, there are at least forty-nine separate jurisdictions in the United States, each of them regarding the others as foreign jurisdictions for purposes of the conflict of laws. However, contact between these jurisdictions is closer and more continuous than the contact that foreign countries experience with one another because, governments within the United States constitute part of the same country. It follows that cooperative enforcement of law across state lines and in the federal-state sphere is of special interest to both nation and states. Wherever called for by its conflict of laws rules, every American jurisdic

-270-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Relations between the Federal and State Courts
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 298

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.