Current Research on Suicide and Parasuicide: Selected Proceedings of the Second European Symposium on Suicidal Behaviour, Edinburgh, June 1988

By Stephen David Platt; Norman Kreitman | Go to book overview
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Suicide and aggression: a comparison of
autoaggressive and externally aggressive
persons in the Nuremberg municipal area

T. A. MOESLER and W. WEIDENHAMMER


Introduction

In 1940 Germany, the great psychiatrist Hans-Walter Gruhle ( Gruhle, 1940) pointed out the connection between suicide actions and externally aggressive bodily injuries. He also suspected relationships in the geographical distribution of autoaggressive and externally aggressive persons or actions which could be analysed in ecological and socio-demographic terms.

So far, only a few researchers have compared autoaggressive and externally aggressive persons ( Ferreira de Castroet al. 1986; Keltikangas-Järvinen, 1978; Modestin, 1986; Moesleret al. 1988) and even fewer have investigated the distribution of these groups of individuals in specific urban districts ( Bagleyet al. 1973; Moschelet al. 1981; Porterfield, 1952). Most recent studies focused on a comparison of persons after suicide actions with victims of violent crime. These investigations are based on the concept that the victims of external aggression have contributed to the violent act by an autoaggressive attitude 'being at the wrong place at the wrong time' ( Holingeret al. 1987). Whatever one may think about this idea, clear correlations are to be found in the analysis of these two groups. Our study cannot provide any appraisal on victims of violent crime. However, we have some comparative results on autoaggressive and externally aggressive persons using data which have been collected in the context of a broad research project at our clinic. The focal point is the determination of environmental factors which might have promoted or impeded the autoaggressive and externally aggressive behavior of Nuremberg citizens.

This study has not yet been completed. For the present, we can

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