Collected Letters of Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Vol. 1

By Earl Leslie Griggs; Samuel Taylor Coleridge | Go to book overview

PREFACE

IT is a pleasure to acknowledge my indebtedness and gratitude to the many persons who have helped me.

I must first mention Lord Latymer, to whom these volumes are dedicated. My acquaintance with him goes back many years, and he has at all times shown a spirit of friendly and generous cooperation. Three years ago, after I had given up all hope of locating a large number of important Coleridge holographs, quite unexpectedly I received from him a letter describing a collection of Coleridge manuscripts he had recently inherited. To my great surprise, here at last was almost every letter which I had long sought for in vain. In placing his magnificent collection at my disposal Lord Latymer has immeasurably increased the value of my edition of Coleridge's letters. A debt such as mine to him can only be acknowledged; it can never be repaid. To him and to Lady Latymer I am deeply grateful, too, for their gracious and cordial hospitality.

My present undertaking could not have been initiated without the paternal encouragement of the late Rev. G. H. B. Coleridge. He not only gave me access to his large collection of Coleridge papers, but he and the late Mrs. Coleridge were always the most kind and indulgent of friends. I shall always remember them with deep affection. To their children, too, I must express my affection and indebtedness: to Mr. A. H. B. Coleridge for generously making available to me the Coleridge manuscripts formerly belonging to his father, and for giving me his valuable collection of the E. H. Coleridge transcripts of Coleridge's letters and the correspondence between E. H. Coleridge and J. Dykes Campbell; to Mrs. Phyllis Coleridge Hooper for assistance in my search for Coleridge manuscripts; to the Rev. A. D. Coleridge for loaning me the Thomas Ward copy-book; and to the Rev. Nicholas F. D. Coleridge for the use of his copy of the Biographia Literaria containing an important letter from Coleridge to his son Derwent.

Other members of the Coleridge family have been equally helpful: Lord and Lady Coleridge, who gave me permission to use the collection of Coleridge manuscripts formerly in the Chanter's House, Ottery St. Mary, and now in the British Museum; Lady Cave, who graciously placed at my disposal Coleridge's early letters in the 'Salston' collection; and Mr. Paul Coleridge, who made available to me the letters in his possession.

I gratefully acknowledge the courtesy of the librarians and the trustees of the following institutions for granting me permission

-vii-

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Collected Letters of Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface to the Corrected Edition vi
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiii
  • List of Letters xv
  • Abbreviations and Principal References xxxi
  • Introduction xxxiii
  • 1. to His Mother 1
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