Introduction to Group-Analytic Psychotherapy: Studies in the Social Integration of Individuals and Groups

By S. H. Foulkes | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I have conveyed my thanks to my Army colleagues in the text. Here I want to express my sincere gratitude to those colleagues who co-operate with me since the end of the war.

They are practising Group Therapy in their various Hospitals and elsewhere, where most of them have actually introduced this form of Treatment -- an arduous task. I must refrain from mentioning their names individually for the following reasons: while their preference is for the group-analytic approach and their work is thus oriented, it would be premature to commit them at this stage to the opinions expressed in this book, for which I must take sole responsibility. Furthermore, we have been working as a group, and it would appear to me difficult as well as unfair to single out individual contributions. As a group, however, they have implicitly contributed a great deal, more than they would likely be ready to admit. Many of the more essential formulations have emerged as a result of our lively discussions and the interesting clinical observations and technical problems which were raised. As a token of my gratitude it is to them that this book is dedicated.

Dr. Martin James, M.R.C.P., D.P.M., belongs to both of the above-mentioned categories. He was one of the first to take interest in this work while at Northfield, and after returning to civilian life has been always in close co-operation with me. He has since been introducing group-analytic treatment at the Middlesex Hospital, London, and has thus opened up a field of independent experience in this Method.

He has been actively assisting in the writing of this book, for which I want to express my special gratitude here. He has contributed a number of valuable clinical illustrations and helped throughout in the clarification of formulations. Apart from this share in the actual content of this book, he has spared no time or effort to render most valuable assistance in a great number of details and in practical ways.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Introduction to Group-Analytic Psychotherapy: Studies in the Social Integration of Individuals and Groups
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 181

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.