Pornography and Representation in Greece and Rome

By Amy Richlin | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The editor would like to thank the original Pornography and Representation in Greece and Rome collective--Madeleine Henry, Sandra Joshel, Molly Myerowitz, Terri Marsh, and Robert Sutton--for all their work and for many stimulating discussions; and all the contributors for their cooperation and joie de vivre. It was a great pleasure and excitement to read the drafts as they took shape, to talk over changes and ideas, and to see feminist theory applied to such a range of areas in Classics, often for the first time.

Thanks to the Berkshire Conference for hosting the fast panel, on rape and Roman history; and to the Women's Classical Caucus of the American Philological Association for inviting the second one, on the pornographic in antiquity. One person must be thanked above all. To Marilyn Skinner I owe the idea of making this book, and in a way the book is a by-product of our ten years of epistolary debate, discussion, exegesis, and inspiration. Her example of commitment to excellence in both classical learning and feminist thought made this book thinkable, and I am deeply grateful.

Many thanks to Marleeta Wood of Lehigh University for her control of the project's communications, and to Ellen Bauer of the University of Southern California for coping with the bibliography.

To those friends, colleagues, and relatives who so generously gave of their time to help with the final editing, three cheers: Karen Banfield, Shelby Brown, Jane Cody, Carolyn Dewald, Alvin Lim, Martha Malamud, Samuel Richlin, Sylvia Richlin, Terry Seymour, W. Gregory Thalmann.

Special thanks to Peter Bingham, always good company. Finally, I thank Rachel Toor, Herbert Addison, and the Oxford University Press for their enthusiastic support, which helped so much toward the timely completion of the book; and the National Endowment for the Humanities for some borrowed time.

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Pornography and Representation in Greece and Rome
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 324

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.