Alexander Hamilton: Portrait in Paradox

By John C. Miller | Go to book overview

Introduction

The period in which Alexander Hamilton lived was an age of great men and great events. In the United States,
besides Hamilton himself, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and John Marshall held the center of the stage; while the European
scene was dominated by William Pitt, Charles James Fox and Napoleon Bonaparte. And yet, Talleyrand, whose career is a convincing testimonial
of his astuteness in judging men and measures and who was intimately ac
quainted with the leaders on both sides of the Atlantic, pronounced Alexan
der Hamilton to be the greatest of these "choice and master spirits of the
age."

Probably no American statesman has displayed more constructive imagination than did Hamilton. Prodigal of ideas, bursting with plans for diversifying the American economy and obsessed by a determination to make the United States a powerful nation under a centralized government, he left an imprint upon this country that time has not yet effaced. Of some of our institutions it may be justly said that they are the lengthened shadow of one man--Alexander Hamilton.

In Hamilton's comparatively brief span, he lived through three great wars, in two of which he was an active participant. Whenever he looked abroad he found wars or rumors of wars. As a result, the conviction was implanted in him that the survival of the United States depended to a great degree upon its warmaking potential. If this was a harsh and unattractive philosophy, at least it could be said to have been based upon the facts of international life as Hamilton knew them.

Everything depended, he believed, upon strengthening the union: if it perished, Americans would never attain the liberty, material well-being and happiness to which they aspired. Even his financial and economic plans were but means to the great end of solidifying the union; in his hands, capitalism became a barrier against the strong centrifugal forces that threatened to reduce the central government to impotence.

Paradoxically enough, the abounding love of the American union that actuated Hamilton was partly owing to the fact that he was born outside

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Alexander Hamilton: Portrait in Paradox
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 662

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.