Alexander Hamilton: Portrait in Paradox

By John C. Miller | Go to book overview

35.
Defender of the Freedom of the Press

Had Hamilton acted upon the ideas he was expressing in newspapers, speeches and private letters, he no doubt would have sold his property, gathered his wife and children about him and taken ship for England, where, Jefferson always maintained, he properly belonged. Or he might have gone West, where his chances of surviving among the savages would be vastly better than among the "Jacobins."

In actuality, however, Hamilton was in no hurry to put either the Atlantic Ocean or the American wilderness between himself and Jefferson. Indeed, for a man who presumably believed that the country was headed for a smash, Hamilton's behavior was truly extraordinary. He built an expensive house in the country and plunged into speculation on a large scale quite as though he expected prosperity to continue forever.

Early in 1801, to the distress of his friends, who warned him against the expense of maintaining a country house, Hamilton began the construction of a house on Manhattan Island several miles outside New York City. Here, on seventeen acres, Hamilton proposed to live the life of a country gentleman commuting to the city only to conduct his practice. "To men who have been so much harassed in the base world as myself," he remarked, "it is natural to look forward to a comfortable retirement. . . . A garden is a very useful refuge for a disappointed politician.""Experience more and more convinces me," he added, "that true happiness is only to be found in the bosom of one's own family." As befitted a man descended from Scottish lords, he called his country seat "The Grange" after the ancestral home in Scotland. On what is now 144th Street, he built his house, fondly imagining, no doubt, that it would shelter future generations of Hamiltons in rural seclusion. 1

As his friends had predicted, country living proved to be costly beyond all expectations. To his consternation, Hamilton discovered that instead of enjoying the leisure and repose of semiretirement, he had to work harder than ever to keep "The Grange" going. Moreover, he found it necessary to maintain a town house as well: a confirmed theatergoer and man about town, Hamilton was unable to immure himself in the country. At consider

-544-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Alexander Hamilton: Portrait in Paradox
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 662

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.