Abortion without Apology: A Radical History for the 1990s

By Ninia Baehr | Go to book overview

ILLUSTRATION CREDITS
Most of the illustrations in this pamphlet come from the early abortion movement or from the "second wave of feminism." While some of the artists are unknown, what follows is as complete acknowledgments as was possible. Thanks to all who helped create and collect these graphics.The graphics on pages 3, 7, and 45 are by Pat McGinnis and are used with her permission.
Page 5: artist unknown; graphic reprinted from The New Woman's Survival Catalog, ed. Kirsten Grimstad and Susan Rennie, ( New York: Coward McCann and Geoghegan, 1973). It was reprinted there from the cover of Sister, July 1973.
Page 23: photographer unknown; reprinted from " How to do Self Examination Using the Plastic Speculum," a flier distributed by the Feminist Women's Health Center, Hollywood, CA, 1972.
Page 24: Suzanne Gage; from Menstrual Extraction brochure reprinted from Quest vol. 4, no. 3, summer, 1978, and distributed by Feminist Women's Health Centers.
Page 25: Wen-ti Tsen; the graphic is reprinted from Community Press Features, it originally appeared in Science for the People, and is used with the artist's permission.
Page 32: artist is unknown; from Come Unity and Community Press Features.
Page 37: Bülbül, Arachne Publishing, P.0. Box 4100, Mountain View, CA 94040; reproduced from The Monthly Extract: An Irregular Periodical, January 1978, and May/June 1976; used with the artist's permission.
Page 41: Irene Peslikis; with the artist's permission.
Page 54: artist is unknown; from Community Press Features.
Page 57: artist is unknown; reprinted from Women Under Attack, by the CARASA collective (South End Press, 1989).
Page 59: Teresa Flavin; the graphic originally appeared in Zeta Magazine and is used with the artist's permission.

Copyright © 1990 by Ninia Baehr

Any properly footnoted quotation of up to 500 sequential words may be used
without permission, as long as the total number of words quoted does not exceed
2,000. For longer quotations or for a greater number of words quoted, written per-
mission from the publisher is required.

First edition. Cover design by Ty de Pass.Production by the South End
Press collective. Manufactured in the United States.

South End Press, 116 St. Botolph Street, Boston, MA 02115.

99 98 97 96 95 94 93

23456789

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Baehr, Ninia.
Abortion without apology: radical history for the 1990s / Ninia Baehr.
p. cm.
Includes bibliographical references.
ISBN 0-89608-384-5
1. Pro-choice movement— United States. 2. Abortion—Moral and ethical
aspects. I. Title.
HQ767.5.U5B34 1990

363.4'6'0973—dc20

90-33244

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Abortion without Apology: A Radical History for the 1990s
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Abortion Without Apology - A Radical History for the 1990s *
  • Illustration Credits *
  • Table of Contents *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: The Army of Three - Making Abortion Public 7
  • 2: Woman-Controlled Abortion - The Self-Help Health Movement 21
  • 3: Speak Truth to Power - The New York Fight 31
  • 4: Lessons for the 1990s 51
  • 5: Organizing for the Future 61
  • Resources 63
  • Bibliography 65
  • About South End Press *
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