The International Conferences of American States, 1889-1928: A Collection of the Conventions, Recommendations, Resolutions, Reports, and Motions Adopted by the First Six International Conferences of the American States, and Documents Relating to the Organization of the Conferences

By James Brown Scott; Carnegie Endowment for International Peace et al. | Go to book overview

ORGANIZATION OF THE CONFERENCE
INVITATION TO THE CONFERENCE
THE MINISTER OF FOREIGN RELATIONS OF MEXICO TO THE MINISTERS PLENI
POTENTIARY OF THE REPUBLICS OF NORTH, CENTRAL AND SOUTH
AMERICA1

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF FOREIGN RELATIONS,

Mexico, August 15th, 1900.

YOUR EXCELLENCY: The Mexican Ambassador, as well as all the American representatives in Washington, has received from the Government of the United States, a circular in which a meeting is proposed, as soon as practicable, of a Second American International Conference, similar to that held in the year 1889, although not in the same city, but in one of the other capitals of the New World. Shortly afterwards, the Honorable Secretary of State, in a conversation with our Ambassador, informed him of the great pleasure it would give his Government if the city of Mexico was named as the place in which the proposed meeting should be held.

On learning of this conversation I stated in the name of the President of the Republic, that if the greater part of the Governments interested were willing to name this capital as the place where the Conference was to be held, it would give us the greatest pleasure, and we should appreciate as an honor the visit of the Delegates sent by our sister Republics of America; but, if for such an interesting Congress, some other city was named, no matter which, we would send our Delegates.

Finally, the majority of the American Representatives accredited at Washington, following the instructions of their respective Governments, designated this capital with the aforesaid object; and we thank them for the honorable distinction, which, although without having been solicited, is highly appreciated, and accepted with true fraternal sentiments.

Without fully referring to the object of an assembly of such noteworthy interest, its main features having been fully explained in 1889 in numerous minutes and publications, I take the liberty to enclose a programme of the

____________________
1
Second International American Conference, Mexico, 1901-1902. Organization of the Conference, Projects, Reports, Motions, Debates and Resolutions (Mexico, 1902), p. 3.

-51-

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