Bleep! Censoring Rock and Rap Music

By Betty Houchin Winfield; Sandra Davidson | Go to book overview

1
From Fine Romance to Good Rockin' -- and Beyond: Look What They've Done to My Song

Michael J. Budds

You want to know what I think of that abomination, rock 'n' roll? I think it is a disgrace. Poison put to sound! When I hear it I feel very sad not only for music but for the people who are addicted to it. I am also very sorry for America -- that such a great country should have nothing better to pour into the expectant ear of mankind than this raucous distillation of the ugliness of our times, performed by juveniles for juveniles. It is a terrible and sardonic trick of fate that the children of the present century should have to grow up with their bodies under continual bombardment from atomic fall-out and their souls exposed to rock 'n' roll.1

-- Pablo Casals, 1961

Rock and roll fans, if even a portion of what the critics have said was true, by now would be stone deaf, with their minds burnt out by drugs, and their bodies wasted by excessive fornication. That none of this is true has never bothered rock opponents nor caused them to pause in their attacks. Rock-bashing has remained constant since the mid-1950s both in content and style.2

- Linda Martin and Kerry Segrave, 1993

No musical repertory in Western civilization has aroused more controversy than rock and roll. No musical repertory has attracted so many powerful and self-righteous opponents. No musicians, viewed as a representative group, have taken such selfindulgent and often self-destructive delight in combining the roles of entertainer/artist and social outlaw. One need only invoke characterizations of three identifiable strains of this music -- "shock rock," "cock rock," and "schlock rock" -- to appreciate its

-1-

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