CHAPTER 17
Group V Occupations:
Outdoor

THIS GROUP includes occupations in agriculture, animal husbandry, fisheries, forestry, and mining. These are the occupations by which our natural resources are cultivated, gathered, or otherwise accumulated. The end products may be used without further change, other than processing for preservation and handling, or they may be the raw materials which are then modified by the various technical processes with which Group IV occupations are concerned. It is difficult to find a comprehensive name for this Group. "Outdoor work" is descriptive of most of the occupations although one might quibble over its application to mining. A considerable degree of physical activity is characteristic of most of these occupations, and at all Levels.

This is the most neglected Group as far as psychological studies go, although it includes a large proportion of the population. Of the experienced workers in the United States in 1940, 18 per cent of the white and 35 per cent of the Negro workers were in the group of farm operators, tenants, and laborers alone. One reason for the neglect may be that, except in some of the mining occupations, there is generally no such concentration of personnel as there is in most of the other Groups.

Table 17.1 lists different occupations in this Group at the different Levels.

The only available studies in this Group are on farmers, as reported below. The subjects, except students, are probably at Level 3.


Farmers

Wilcox, Bras, and Pond have made an interesting study of factors associated with financial returns in farming. Their subjects were 136 dairy, hog, and poultry farmers, who were asked about their reasons

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