Rural Land Tenure in the United States: A Socio-Economic Approach to Problems, Programs, and Trends

By Alvin L. Bertrand; Floyd L. Corty et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SEVENTEEN
Tenure Research Trends
and Needs in the United States

RURAL SOCIAL SCIENTISTS in the United States are continuously striving to discover ways and means of solving tenure problems. Currently the subjects under investigation by researchers include a variety of topics associated with recent trends in agricultural technology, population shifts, and agricultural programs. The topics listed in this chapter represent some of the more important areas which are being looked into or need looking into. Most of the topics treated here were reviewed in a recent publication issued by the Interregional Land Tenure Research Committee. 1


The Difficulty of Getting Started in Farming

Preceding discussions made it clear that the scarcity of land and the high costs of capital investment in machinery, livestock, etc., have made it difficult for the young person to get started in farming in the United States. This condition is considered one of the more serious tenure problems of today by many persons. The baffling question is, how can agriculture attract, acquire, and maintain its proportionate share of the qualified youths of the nation. Attempts to find answers to this question occupy the energies of many rural social scientists. The goal is to overcome institutional barriers to farm ownership by encouraging family-sized farms and making capital available for purchase or operation of economical units.


The Relative Efficiency of Alternative Tenure Arrangements

The various types of tenure arrangements found in this country and abroad have been discussed in preceding chapters. Many questions

____________________
1
A Report Prepared by the Interregional Land Tenure Research Committee, Agricultural Land Tenure Research, Scope Nature: Reappraisal, 1955 ( Chicago: Farm Foundation, 1955).

-271-

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