American Extremists: Militias, Supremacists, Klansmen, Communists & Others

By John George; Laird Wilcox | Go to book overview

9. Workers World Party

In 1958 a group of fewer than one hundred people left the Socialist Workers party because, by supporting a United Socialist ticket in the New York state elections that year, the SWP had given their blessing to social democrats (an unpardonable sin to the true revolutionary). This split actually began over the Hungarian Revolution, which the splitters claimed was led by social democrats ("The enemies of the people are everywhere!"); therefore, they said, Soviet intervention was certainly justified. This dissenting group became known as the Workers World party. The primary periodical of this group is a monthly tabloid, appropriately called Workers World.

According to Harvey Klehr:

Some of its founders had been close to the Cochran faction of the SWP, expelled in 1953 for advocating "entrism," a tactic whereby Trotskyists were urged to disband their parties and enter communist or socialist parties in order to subvert them from within. 1

Led by Vince Copeland and Sam Marcy, who, from the sixties into the nineties, have exercised strict discipline over a membership of about two hundred, the WWP always has been a very militant group. Quick to yell "fascist" and fill the air with unfounded accusations, WWP members might be included among the more dogmatic and opinionated on the extreme left. But, after all, as one young independent leftist told us in 1970, "What can you expect from a Maoist party built on a Trotskyist base?" The Workers World party of the late 1980s and the early 1990s, however, has been an independent communist organization claiming to support all Marxist nations.

Workers World has always conveyed the idea that the Central Intelligence Agency controls almost everything within the United States and most things abroad. Leaders have even gone so far as to link the CIA with George Lincoln Rockwell, the late commander of the American Nazi party, assassinated in 1967 by one of his fellow Nazis. Both organizations have had offices in Arlington, Virginia, and according to Workers World this somehow is a significant fact.

The Workers World party controls a youth group called Youth Against War and Fascism (YAWF). Not a membership group in the card carrying sense, YAWF consists of a few hundred young lefitsts willing to follow the leadership of Workers World party people who serve as the officers of YAWF. This organization has been one of the more direct-action-oriented youth groups in America With only

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