American Extremists: Militias, Supremacists, Klansmen, Communists & Others

By John George; Laird Wilcox | Go to book overview

23. Assorted Neo-Nazis

The neo-Nazi movement in the United States is characterized by two outstanding traits: small size and large capacity to generate media coverage. Estimates vary, but it's unlikely that at any time the various post-World War II "Nazi" parties ever exceeded two thousand members aggregate, and a more reasonable figure is half of that. According to Irwin Suall and David Lowe of the Anti-Defamation League: "Hard-core membership in the avowedly neo-Nazi groups in the U.S. has declined steadily over the past decade, from a peak of 1,000-1,200 in 1978 to no more than 400-500 in 1987." 1 A substantial percentage of these were informants from various government and private agencies, probably exceeding the 6 percent figure attributed to informants in the Ku Klux Klan in the 1960s. (It's worth noting, incidentally, that 450 neo-Nazis amount to one for every half million Americans.)

The term "neo-Nazi" is probably used too freely and quite often merely as an epithet. In some cases it is used as a synonym for anti-Semite and racist. However, not all anti-Semitic or racist groups affect the recognizable Nazi style and symbolism, nor do they necessarily identify with Nazism per se. Such indiscriminate usage is irresponsible and only distorts an already murky and difficult problem of definition. For our purposes "neo-Nazi" means an organization or party that generally adopts or advocates traditional Nazi symbolism, including the swastika or approximate equivalent; the wearing of uniforms or other paraphernalia, the use of the terms "Nazi," "Nationalist Socialist," or some variation in its name; and a demonstrated reverence for or appreciation of Adolf Hitler and the Third Reich. (Two rather unique groups—the National States Rights party and National Christian Publishers—are discussed in separate chapters.)

Post- World War II revelations about the nature of Nazi Germany and the Holocaust dramatically erased any possibility of a significant American Nazi movement. Uniform hostility to Nazi values in the culture, a wholly unsympathetic news media, the gradually increasing participation of minorities in the politics of the nation, and many other factors have virtually assured that any neo-Nazi movement would remain highly marginalized. Nevertheless, several small groups have formed. Their history tends to consist of two elements: a biography of their leaders (since virtually all of them have revolved around the personality of a single individual), and an account of their troubles (with infiltrators, FBI informants, local law enforcement, and one another). Successes, if one could call them that, have been trivial and fleeting.

In December 1954 the House Committee on Un-American Activities issued its Preliminary Report on Neo-Fascist and Hate Groups

-323-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Extremists: Militias, Supremacists, Klansmen, Communists & Others
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 443

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.