A Skeptic's Handbook of Parapsychology

By Paul Kurtz | Go to book overview

Contributors
CHARLES AKERS received his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Texas in 1978. He was a research associate at the Institute for Parapsychology in 1978-79 and continued this research at Harvard University in 1984-85 under a grant from the Hodgson Fund. He is a member of the Parapsychology Subcommittee of the Committee for the Scientific Investigation of Claims of the Paranormal.
JAMES E. ALCOCK is a social psychologist on the faculty of Glendon College, York University, Toronto, Canada.His research interests include the study of belief systems. He is the author of Parapsychology: Science or Magic and many articles on parapsychological belief. Professor Alcock is on the Executive Council and chairman of the Education Subcommittee of the Committee for the Scientific Investigation of Claims of the Paranormal.
JOHN BELOFF retired in 1984 as senior lecturer in the Department of Psychology of the University of Edinburgh.He is a former president of both the Parapsychological Association and the Society for Psychical Research ( London).
SUSAN BLACKMORE is at present Visiting Fellow at the Brain and Perception laboratory, University of Bristol, England. Dr. Blackmore is the author of Beyond the Body and numerous articles on parapsychology. She is a member of the Council of the Society for Psychical Research and editor of its newsletter.
JOHN E. COOVER ( 1872-1938) was professor of psychology at Stanford University.He is the author of Experiments in Psychic Research ( 1917).
PERSI DIACONIS is a professor of statistics at Stanford University.He spent ten years working as a professional magician and occasionally applies both fields of expertise to problems in parapsychology.
ERIC DINGWALL, a veteran psychical researcher, was for years associated with the British Society for Psychical Research. Among his many books are Some Human Oddities, Very Peculiar People, and Ghosts and Spirits in the Ancient World.
ANTONY FLEW is Emeritus Professor of philosophy at the University of Reading, England.He is the author of Hume's Philosophy of Belief and Thinking Straight, among many other books, and a Fellow of the Committee for the Scientific Investigation of Claims of the Paranormal.
MARTIN GARDNER is the author of Science: Good, Bad, and Bogus ( 1981) and Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science ( 1952) and of some forty books in the fields of science, mathematics, philosophy, and literary criticism. The Skeptical Inquirer carries his regular column "Notes of a Psi-Watcher." He is a member of the Executive Council of the Committee for the Scientific Investigation of Claims of the Paranormal.

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