A Skeptic's Handbook of Parapsychology

By Paul Kurtz | Go to book overview

7
Spiritualism Exposed:
Margaret Fox Kane Confesses to Fraud

The following article containing the confession of Margaret Fox Kane was published in the New York Worldon October 21, 1888. In her confession, Margaret reveals how she and her sisters Kate and Leah perpetrated the fraud.—ED.

On many occasions THE WORLD has been able to expose the fraudulent practices of so-called spirit mediums and turn the bright light of careful investigation upon the secret methods of these social vampires. Several times have WORLD reporters torn the white robes from the mediums as they groped about their darkened parlors deceiving their dupes into the belief that the returned spirits of their friends were before them. Besides this many persons have been saved from the clutches of these soulless impostors just as the mediums were about to hold them within their avaricious grasp.

But the severest blow that Spiritualism has ever received is delivered to-day through the solemn declarations of the greatest medium of the world that it is all a fraud, a deception and a lie. This statement is made by Mrs. Margaret Fox Kane, who has been able, through long training and early muscular development, to produce peculiar rappings and knocks which were affirmed to be spiritual manifestations, and which were so skillfully done as to baffle all attempts at discovery. It was this woman, then Miss Margaret Fox, and the most expert of the world-famed "Fox sisters," who was first brought before the public as a medium. Her tour of the great cities of the Unted States is historical. She was seen by most of the prominent theologians, physicians and professional men, but there was not one who could solve the mysterious power that seemed to possess her nor imitate her alleged spiritual rappings.

The Exposure is Complete

The unparalleled excitement caused by these young girls suggested to the minds of many unscrupulous persons the vast financial field that lay before anybody who should pretend similar mediumistic powers. At once there were hundreds of

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