A Skeptic's Handbook of Parapsychology

By Paul Kurtz | Go to book overview

25
Parapsychology and Quantum Mechanics
MARTIN GARDNER

Watson: "This is indeed a mystery. What do you imagine it means?"

Holmes: "I have no data yet. It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts."

— Sir Arthur Conan Doyle,
A Scandal in Bohemia

Parapsychologists differ considerably about the "facts" of their trade, but there is a fairly solid core of beliefs on which most of them agree. They are convinced that psi powers (ESP and PK) are possessed in some degree by everybody, and to a high degree by a few. Almost all agree that psi forces are independent of time and distance. (ESP is defined here as the alleged ability to perceive or sense by means other than the known physical senses. PK is defined here as mind over matter—the alleged ability to move or alter objects by paranormal means.)

There is, of course, no way they can be sure that extrasensory perception (ESP) and psychokinesis (PK) are manifestations of a single power. Even ESP (which includes telepathy, clairvoyance, and precognition) may, from their point of view, be a name for several kinds of interactions. However, parapsychologists have always been partial to the notion that a single force is responsible for both ESP and PK. If so, what kind of force is it?

Modern physics recognizes four fundamental forces: gravity, electromagnetism, and the weak and strong nuclear forces. All are field phenomena with strengths that diminish with distance. As J. B. Rhine perceived early in the game, there is no reasonable way that any such force can explain the peculiar indifference of psi to distance and time. Moreover, electromagnetism, long a favorite among early researchers, seems ruled out by experiments that show that

____________________
Reprinted from Science and the Paranormal, edited by George 0. Abell and Barry Singer ( New York: Scribner's, 1983), with the permission of the Estate of George 0. Abell.

-585-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Skeptic's Handbook of Parapsychology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 727

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.