The Welfare State Crisis and the Transformation of Social Service Work

By Michael B. Fabricant; Steve Burghardt | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

There are a number of people whom we wish to thank for their help in developing this book. The first, literally, are our students who, over the years, awakened us to the changing dimensions of their daily practice and, through their commitment to their clients, challenged us to explore more thoroughly the issues found in this book. We also extend the same gratitude to the workers from three agencies, whose perceptions of their daily work form the basis of the fourth chapter. While both the agencies and the workers must remain anonymous, the effort they extended to us will not be forgotten.

Mimi Abramovitz, Joel Blau, Irwin Epstein, and Betsy Fabricant all gave careful and helpful readings to various sections of the book. Marilyn Russell of the University of Southern Maine and Peter Pecora also provided us with some of their own important work, which helped us as we developed our ideas. We also wish to pay an intellectual debt to Fred Block, Christine Cousins, Paulo Freire, Ian Gough, M. L. Larson, Pat Morgan, and James O'Connor for the influence of their work on our own.

Tom Jennings and Judith Segel of the Hunter College School of Social Work were consistently available and remarkably adept at locating often-difficult reference and bibliographic material, always handling our requests with graciousness and professionalism.

Liz Addis, professional typist and amateur hieroglyphics expert by the end of the final draft, was a great help throughout. Philip Selikoff handled our duplicating needs with promptness, efficiency, and a dash of needed humor.

Michael Weber, Alexandra Koppen, and Susanna Sharpe, our editors at M.E. Sharpe, provided thoughtful, painstaking, and helpful comments throughout our work. Our book has been strengthened through their efforts.

Finally, we wish to thank our families and friends for all they endured over the last two years. Their love, support, and tolerance were all greatly appreciated.

-xi-

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