The Spanish-Americans of New Mexico: A Heritage of Pride

By Nancie L. González | Go to book overview

hierarchy were those with greater wealth in land or livestock, or both; they tended to be of purer Caucasian descent; they were somewhat better educated; and in many cases they were either of the military or descended from military leaders. The lowest class was composed of Indian slaves and servants, poor mestizos, and rural peasants, regardless of race. This traditional culture shared with Mexico will be examined further, as will some of the ways in which New Mexico has diverged from the parental patterns in recent years. At the same time this may throw light on the alleged "uniqueness" of the Spanish-American in relation to other groups of Spanish descent in the Southwest today.


Notes
1
A cautioning note in regard to the so-called archaisms is in order. Consider the following quotation:

A familiar notion of American folk-linguistics is that the Southern highlander speaks "pure Elizabethan English." This is manifestly untrue. They do have a number of conservative traits of language . . . but these are counter- balanced by many innovations not found outside the area, as well as by innovations that they share with other regions. "Pure Elizabethan English" became extinct with the Elizabethans, but its elements persist, mixed with various innovations in ALL English dialects ( Gleason 1961:404).

The same argument holds for Spanish linguistic forms in New Mexico. Furthermore, on the alleged purity of New Mexican Spanish, Edmonson says, "Although many Hispanos tend to pride themselves on the purity of their Spanish, their dialect clearly embodies a large part of the Nahuatl vocabulary of Mexican" ( 1957:16).

2
The Albuquerque Journal, June 22, 1966, carried a story about two elderly women who were taking English lessons so they might converse with their grandchildren and great-grandchildren. See also Marden and Meyer ( 1962:138) and Weaver ( 1965:148).
3
This, in fact, is the way in which the Mexican-American Study Project has gone about locating the bases for its samples. (The Mexican-American Study Project, under the auspices of the Division of Research, Graduate School of

-30-

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The Spanish-Americans of New Mexico: A Heritage of Pride
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vi
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Notes xv
  • Chapter I - Setting 5
  • Notes 14
  • Chapter II - Language, Race, and Culture 15
  • Notes 30
  • Chapter III - Early Settlement and Traditional Culture 33
  • Notes 55
  • Chapter IV - Social System 58
  • Notes 83
  • Chapter V - Voluntary Associations 86
  • Notes 114
  • Chapter VI - The Wages of Change 116
  • Notes 134
  • Chapter VII - Effects of Urbanization 136
  • Notes 176
  • Chapter VIII - The Continuing Scene: Activism in New Mexico, 1966-1969 179
  • Notes 195
  • Chapter IX - Summary and Conclusions 197
  • Notes 213
  • Bibliography 215
  • Index 237
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