J. D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye

By Harold Bloom | Go to book overview
Chronology
1919 Jerome David Salinger is born in New York City on January 1, to Sol Salinger, a prosperous Jewish meat and cheese importer, and Miriam Jillich Salinger, a woman of Scottish-Irish descent.
1934 Enrolls in Valley Forge Military Academy, in Pennsylvania.
1936 Graduates from Valley Forge Military Academy.
1938 Travels in Europe and begins writing short stories.
1939 Takes a short story writing course taught by Whit Burnett at Columbia University.
1940 First short story, " The Young Folks," published in Story, the magazine Whit Burnett edits.
1941 Sells first story about Holden Caulfield to the New Yorker but publication is delayed until after World War II.
1942 Drafted into United States Army and attends Officers, First Sergeants, and Instructors School of the Signal Corps.
1943 Stationed in Nashville, Tennessee, achieving the rank of staff sergeant. Transferred to the Army Counter-Intelligence Corps. Short story " The Varioni Brothers" published in the Saturday Evening Post.
1944 Transferred to Europe with the U.S. Army Fourth Infantry Division. Lands at Utah Beach, Normandy with D-Day invasion forces and participates in the liberation of France. Serves as Security Agent for the Twelfth Infantry Regiment.

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