Tennessee Williams's A Streetcar Named Desire

By Harold Bloom | Go to book overview
chronology
1911
Born Thomas Lanier Williams in Columbus, Mississippi.
1911-18
Lives with mother and sister Rose and maternal grandparents, as father is often away on business. They move often, finally settling in St. Louis, Missouri.
1927
Wins prize for essay, " Can a Good Wife Be a Good Sport?" then published in Smart Set magazine.
1928
Visits Europe with grandfather. First story published in Weird Tales: "The Vengeance of Nitocris."
1929
Enters University of Missouri.Wins honorable mention for first play, Beauty Is the World.
1931
Father withdraws him for flunking ROTC at university. Works at father's shoe company.
1935
Released from job after illness and recuperates at grandparents' house in Memphis, where his play Cairo! Shanghai! Bombay! is produced.
1936-37
Enters and is later dropped from Washington University, St. Louis. Enters University of Iowa.First full-length plays produced: The Fugitive Kind and Candles to the Sun. Prefrontal lobotomy performed on sister Rose.
1938
Graduates from University of Iowa.
1939
First uses name "Tennessee" on " The Field of Blue Children," published in Story magazine. Travels from New Orleans to California to Mexico to New Mexico to St. Louis. Awarded $1,000 Rockefeller grant. Begins new full-length play, Battle of Angels.
1940
Moves to New York to enroll in advanced playwrighting seminar taught by John Gassner at The New School.
1941-43
Takes various jobs in Provincetown, New York, Macon

-123-

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