Ernest Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms

By Harold Bloom | Go to book overview

Contributors
HAROLD BLOOM, Sterling Professor of the Humanities at Yale University, is the author of The Anxiety of Influence, Poetry and Repression, and many other volumes of literary criticism. His forthcoming study, Freud: Transference and Authority, attempts a full-scale reading of all of Freud's major writings. A MacArthur Prize Fellow, he is general editor of five series of literary criticism published by Chelsea House.During 1987-88, he was appointed Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry at Harvard University.
DANIEL J. SCHNEIDER is Professor of English at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville.His books include The Consciousness of D. H. Lawrence: An Intellectual Biography, The Crystal Cage: Adventures of the Imagination in the Fiction of Henry James, and Symbolism: The Manichean Vision: A Study in the Art of James, Conrad, Woolf, and Stevens.
ROBERT MERRILL is Professor of English at the University of Nevada, Reno, and the author of numerous scholarly articles on twentieth-century American literature.
WILLIAM ADAIR is Professor of English at the University of Utah at Salt Lake City He has published several essays on the works of Ernest Hemingway.
MICHAEL S. REYNOLDS is Professor of English at North Carolina State University.He is the author of Hemingway's First War: The Making of A Farewell to Arms, Hemingway's Reading, 1910-1940, and the recent acclaimed biography, The Young Hemingway.
JUDITH FETTERLEY is Professor of English at the State University of New York, Albany.She is the author of The Resisting Reader: A Feminist Approach to American Fiction as well as of a number of articles treating the sexual politics of American literature.

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Ernest Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Ernest Hemingway's a Farewell to Arms *
  • Modern Critical Interpretations *
  • A Farewell to Arms *
  • Contents *
  • Editor's Note vii
  • Introduction 1
  • The Novel as Pure Poetry 9
  • Tragic Form in a Farewell to Arms 25
  • A Farewell to Arms: A Dream Book 33
  • Going Back 49
  • Hemingway's "Resentful Cryptogram" 61
  • The Sense of an Ending in a Farewell to Arms 77
  • Frederic Henry's Escape and the Pose of Passivity 97
  • Pseudoautobiography and Personal Metaphor 113
  • Catherine Barkley and the Hemingway Code: Ritual and Survival in a Farewell to Arms 131
  • Chronology 149
  • Contributors 151
  • Bibliography 153
  • Acknowledgments 157
  • Index 159
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