Modern Black American Fiction Writers

By Harold Bloom | Go to book overview

Ann Petry
b. 1912

ANN PETRY was bom Ann Lane on October 12, 1912, in Old Saybrook, Connecticut.Her father was a pharmacist who operated his own drugstore, so that the Lanes were generally accepted by the white population of Old Saybrook in spite of the fact that they were only one of two black families in the small town. Several other members of Ann's family were also pharmacists. Ann began writing stories and poems while at Old Saybrook High School, from which she graduated in 1929; she then decided to pursue the family career by attending the College of Pharmacy of the University of Connecticut.She received a Ph.G. degree in 1931 and worked for seven years at her family's pharmacies in Old Saybrook and Lyme.

In 1938 Ann married the mystery writer George D. Petry; they have one daughter. Petry moved to Harlem, writing advertising copy for the Amsterdam News from 1938 to 1941 and being a reporter for the People's Voice from 1941 to 1946 while writing short stories in her spare time. Her first published story was " Marie of the Cabin Club," appearing in the Afro-American for August 19, 1939, under the pseudonym Arnold Petri.In 1943 she enrolled in a writing course at Columbia University; shortly thereafter, she was publishing stories in the Crisis, Opportunity, Phylon, and other journals. Petry's nonliterary life was also busy, as she formed a political group, Negro Women, Inc., lent assistance to a Harlem elementary school, and acted in an American Negro Theater production.

One of Petry's stories, " On Saturday the Siren Sounds at Noon," came to the attention of Houghton Mifflin, which invited her to apply for one of its literary fellowships. The synopsis and first five chapters of what would become Petry's first novel, The Street, won her the Houghton Mifflin Literary Fellowship. The novel was published in 1946 and received highly favorable reviews as a sensitive portrayal of a black woman's life in Harlem.The next year she published Country Place, a novel about small-town life in Connecticut; although all the major characters are white, Petry draws heavily upon her early life in Old Saybrook for many social and topographical

-122-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Modern Black American Fiction Writers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Modern Black American Fiction Writers *
  • Contents *
  • User's Guide vi
  • The Life of the Author Harold Bloom vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Maya Angelou B. 1928 1
  • William Attaway 1911-1986 16
  • James Baldwin 1924-1987 29
  • Ralph Ellison 1914-1994 47
  • Chester Himes 1909-1984 64
  • John Oliver Killens 1916-1987 79
  • Paule Marshall B. 1929 93
  • Willard Motley 1909-1965 108
  • Ann Petry B. 1912 122
  • John A. Williams B. 1925 137
  • Frank Yerby 1916-1991 153
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 167

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.