American Women Fiction Writers, 1900-1960 - Vol. 1

By Harold Bloom | Go to book overview

KAY BOYLE

1902-1992

KAY BOYLE was born on February 19, 1902, in Saint Paul, Minnesota, the youngest of two daughters of Katherine Evans Boyle and Howard Peterson Boyle.A wealthy family, the Boyles lived in Atlantic City, Washington, and Bryn Mawr before settling in Cincinnati after the ruin of the family business. Seemingly prey to every childhood disease and ultimately refusing to attend school at all, Kay had little formal education. Her mother, convinced that Kay was a genius, encouraged her to write and exposed Kay and her sister, Janet, to the works of modern writers and artists; Gertrude Stein's Tender Buttons was a favorite book often read aloud.

In 1922, Kay moved to New York, where she worked at the magazine Broom, wrote book reviews for The Dial, and studied creative writing at Columbia University.A published poet at the age of 21, Boyle left New York for France and married Richard Brault.By 1926, however, she had left Brault and was living with Irish-American poet and editor Ernest Walsh. Boyle's work was published frequently in Walsh's This Quarter and Eugene Jolas's transition. Walsh died of consumption the year Boyle joined him, and six months after his death, their daughter was born.

Living in England in 1927, Boyle published 10 poems, the first part of Plagued by the Nightingale, five short stories, and a review. Increasingly, she was the central figure in her poetry and prose. Although impoverished and alone in Paris in 1928, Boyle became popular among the expatriates and numbered among her friends Harry and Caresse Crosby, James Joyce, Marcel Duchamp, Constantin Brancusi, Hart Crane, and Robert McAlmon.She knew Gertrude Stein and Robert Duncan, the brother of dancer Isadora, whose "simple life movement" was an important influence. Harry Crosby published Boyle's first book, Short Stories, in 1929.

In Paris, Boyle married the painter and surrealist Laurence Vail and continued to write stories, poems, the rest of Plagued by the Nightingale ( 1931), and the novels Year Before Last ( 1932), Gentlemen, I Address You Privately ( 1933), My Next Bride ( 1934), and the disturbingly pro-Fascist Death of a Man ( 1936). In 1936, she left Vail for the anti‐ Fascist Austrian baron Joseph Franckenstein and returned to the United States for the duration of the war.

-33-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Women Fiction Writers, 1900-1960 - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • American Women Fiction Writers 1900-1960 - Volume One *
  • Contents *
  • The Analysis of Women Writers xiii
  • Introduction xvii
  • Djuna Barnes 1
  • Jane Bowles 21
  • Kay Boyle 33
  • Pearl S. Buck 48
  • Willa Cather 64
  • Jessie Redmon Fauset 83
  • Edna Ferber 93
  • Dorothy Canfield Fisher 104
  • Zona Gale 114
  • Charlotte Perkins Gilman 126
  • Ellen Glasgow 143
  • Caroline Gordon 161
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 177

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.