American Women Fiction Writers, 1900-1960 - Vol. 3

By Harold Bloom | Go to book overview

JEAN STAFFORD

1915-1976

JEAN STAFFORD was born on July 1,1915, the youngest of four children of a California walnut rancher. When she was five, her father moved the family to San Diego, and when his business dealings there failed to pan out, he moved the family again, this time to Boulder, Colorado. Stafford earned her bachelor's degree from the University of Colorado, Boulder, and received a fellowship for a year of study at the University of Heidelberg.

After returning from Germany, Stafford supported herself as a teacher. In the late 1930s Stafford met the young aspiring poet Robert Lowell, and after a stormy courtship—including a near-fatal car accident caused by Lowell's drunk driving that put Stafford in the hospital for several months—they were married in 1940. The accident, which necessitated extensive reconstructive surgery on Stafford's face, became the basis for her often-anthologized short story, " The Interior Castle," in which Pansy Vanneman becomes the mouthpiece for Stafford's rage at Lowell's negligence and destructiveness.

Stafford's marriage to Lowell ended in divorce; they were both heavy drinkers and both prone to bouts of depression. Despite being hospitalized for depression in 1946, Stafford managed to complete work on The Mountain Lion ( 1947), a bildungsroman that draws on her unhappy childhood and adolescence in Boulder.In the late 1940s and early '50s, Stafford's short stories began to appear regularly in The New Yorker and other magazines. Her Collected Stories ( 1970) won her a Pulitzer Prize. Her short fiction has been favorably compared with other American masters of the form, such as Hemingway, Wharton, Cather, James, and Twain.She herself praised the writing of Cather, Evelyn Scott (with whom she had a long epistolary friendship), and other women writers. Although she did not define herself as a feminist writer, Stafford's fiction is often quite critical of the roles available to women in contemporary society, particularly women who have artistic ambitions.

Her third novel, The Catherine Wheel ( 1952) was written while she lived in Connecticut with her second husband, a writer for Life magazine. That marriage also ended in divorce and in 1959, Stafford married for a third time. In the late 1950s, Stafford began to write nonfiction more and more regularly and almost entirely ceased to publish fiction. Some biographers suggest that nonfiction was more

-113-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Women Fiction Writers, 1900-1960 - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • American Women Fiction Writers, 1900-1960 - Volume Three *
  • Contents *
  • The Analysis of Women Writers xi
  • Introduction xv
  • Sylvia Plath 1
  • Katherine Anne Porter 23
  • Ayn Rand 42
  • Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings 59
  • Mary Roberts Rinehart 72
  • Mari Sandoz 91
  • Jean Stafford 113
  • Gertrude Stein 135
  • Sui Sin Far or Edith Eaton 156
  • Eudora Welty 178
  • Edith Whartion 204
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 230

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.