American Women Fiction Writers, 1900-1960 - Vol. 3

By Harold Bloom | Go to book overview

SUI SIN FAR OR EDITH EATON

1865-1914

SUI SIN FAR was born Edith Eaton in England in 1865, the eldest daughter of an English-educated Chinese mother, Lotus Blossom Trufusis, and an English father, Edward Eaton.In 1873 the family (including Sui Sin Far's younger sister Winnifred, also a writer) emigrated to Canada and settled in Montreal, where Sui Sin Far received her education and where she began her career as a writer. Between 1898 and 1912, she traveled through the United States working as a journalist, stenographer, and writer of short fiction. Her collection of short stories, Mrs. Spring Fragrance ( 1912), is commonly held to be the first book-length collection by a North American writer of Chinese descent.

Curiously, Sui Sin Far's sister also chose a pseudonym for herself, but in creating a pen name she also created an entire fictional identity; she became Onoto Watanna, a Japanese noblewoman. By choosing a Japanese identity, Winnifred Eaton capitalized on the favored status of the Japanese, who were seen by Americans and Canadians to be the "good Orientals," and were regarded with less suspicion than the Chinese. The difference in perceptions of the Chinese and Japanese was due, in part, to the fact that there were few Japanese in the United States at the turn of the century, and therefore they posed much less of a threat to the white labor force than did the Chinese. In choosing a Chinese pseudonym, therefore, Sui Sin Far made it her life's work to defend her mother's maligned race.

In 1896, Sui Sin Far published an open letter in a Canadian newspaper that explicitly detailed the discriminatory practices used against the Chinese in Canada.Titled " A Plea for the Chinaman," the article argues against a proposed five-hundred-dollar head tax for Chinese‐ American immigrants. In another article a year later, called " The Chinese Woman in America," she described the double bind trapping many Chinese women, who were faced with the archaic sexism of their Chinese husbands and the rampant racism of the white North Americans. She chronicles some of her own experiences with racism and sexism in an article published in 1909, "Leaves from the Mental Portfolio of an Eurasian." The piece anticipates much of the writing done later in the century by other Chinese American writers like Maxine Hong Kingston and Amy Tan.

Mrs. Spring Fragrance combines stories for children and stories about a Chinese woman, her husband, and their community. The

-156-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Women Fiction Writers, 1900-1960 - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • American Women Fiction Writers, 1900-1960 - Volume Three *
  • Contents *
  • The Analysis of Women Writers xi
  • Introduction xv
  • Sylvia Plath 1
  • Katherine Anne Porter 23
  • Ayn Rand 42
  • Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings 59
  • Mary Roberts Rinehart 72
  • Mari Sandoz 91
  • Jean Stafford 113
  • Gertrude Stein 135
  • Sui Sin Far or Edith Eaton 156
  • Eudora Welty 178
  • Edith Whartion 204
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 230

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.