Organizational Public Relations: A Political Perspective

By Christopher Spicer | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
Organizational Politics: Political Behavior and Public Relations Practitioners

Here I am partial to a Russian saying: power is like a high steep cliff, only eagles and reptiles may ascend to it.

-- Furst ( 1991, p. 393)

He was one of those never interested in the choreography of power.

-- Ondaatje ( 1992, p. 195)

Chapter 5 examined how a political metaphor of organization focuses our attention on interests, power, and conflict. Our examination indicated that the political metaphor with which we are most innately familiar is one characterized by adversarial, pluralist democracy. Pfeffer's ( 1982) model highlighted the preconditions necessary for organizational politics to occur: heterogeneous goals and values, differentiation, and scarcity which, in combination, lead to conflict. If the conflict is salient to more than one group and these groups have a degree of dispersed power, politics will occur.

As a response to conflicting demands, politics is more than just a neat metaphor for understanding the workings of organizations. Politics is behavior. Politics is people confronting, cajoling, castigating, compromising, comforting, and creating. It is intimately linked with our interests and our power, our understanding of self as well as the organization. It is uniquely personal as well as often little more than a game to be played ( Baddeley & James, 1986; Cobb, 1986; Dobos, Bahniuk, & Hill, 1987).

-129-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Organizational Public Relations: A Political Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 324

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.