R. J. Huber


ADLERIAN THEORY AND
THE CATCHER IN THE RYE

A Ifred Adler felt that observations of the great writers were invaluable assets to the contemporary psychologist, and, in particular, he found the Bible, Goethe, and Shakespeare extremely helpful in his understanding of human nature. 1 He also engaged in literary interpretation through his comments on the works of Alfred Berger, Dostoevsky, and the diary of the Russian ballet great, Nijinsky. 2 Contemporary Adlerians have shown a sustained interest in literary analysis in articles over the past several years that have appeared in their principle English language journal, The Journal of Individual Psychology. 3 In a recent book Leon Edel has stressed the cogency of Adlerian psychology to understanding literature. 4 The compatibility between literature and Adlerian psychology exists because the writer and the Adlerian psychologist are about the same task, as Phyllis Bottome, a novelist and one of Adler's biographers, states: "Not what happens to people, but how people take what happens to them has always been the chief part of the novelist's task to reveal." 5 The Adlerian psychologist, similarly, is most interested in how one interprets his or her environment. The world view of the individual is a proper beginning for a discussion of Adlerian literary analysis; however, before this topic can be pursued it is necessary to paint a miniature sketch of Adlerian theory.

While it is true that Adler was a member of the original Vienna Psychoanalytic Society, one should not regard him as a disciple of Freud.There is a great deal of evidence indicating that Adler's ideas differed significantly from those of Freud before the two men were acquainted. In his first publication Adler emphasized social factors in the occupational diseases of tailors; this emphasis dominated his thought before, during, and after his association with Freud. 6 It is this difference and others that nurtured the split of Adler from Freud in 1911 because Freud insisted on orthodoxy of thought. In 1911 Adler and his co-workers founded the school of Individual Psychology, which adhered to principles that are the cornerstones of

____________________
From Psychological Perspectives on Literature: Freudian Dissidents and Non-Freudians, a Casebook, edited by Joseph Natoli ( Hamden, CT: Archon, 1984), pp. 43-52.

-144-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Holden Caulfield
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Major Literary Characters *
  • Holden Caulfield *
  • Contents *
  • The Analysis of Character ix
  • Editor's Note xv
  • Introduction i
  • Critical Extracts 5
  • Critical Essays 41
  • The Language of the Catcher in the Rye 41
  • Huck Finn and Holden Caulfield: the Situation of the Hero 50
  • On J. D. Salinger's Novel 58
  • The Saint as a Young Man 64
  • Character and Detail in the Catcher in the Rye 74
  • Allie and Phoebe 80
  • The Catcher in the Rye 87
  • "Don't Ever Tell Anybody Anything" 105
  • Against Obscenity 114
  • In Memoriam: Allie Caulfield 132
  • Adlerian Theory and the Catcher in the Rye 144
  • Holden and the Cold War 153
  • Contributors 166
  • Bibliography 169
  • Acknowledgments 173
  • Index 177
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 182

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.