Am I Black Enough for You? Popular Culture from the 'Hood and Beyond

By Todd Boyd | Go to book overview

Notes

Real Niggaz Don't Die
ONE
1.
These critical tensions, which came in the form of both public debate and private conversation, inform Sut Jhally and Justin Lewis's Enlightened Racism: The Cosby Show, Audiences, and the Myth of the American Dream, a book which analyzes the various discursive arguments that circulated about the program. As a matter of fact, Bill Cosby himself financed the research for the book.
2.
For a detailed discussion of the word "nigger" in popular culture, see my articles "Tarantino's Mantra?" about filmmaker Quentin Tarantino's use of the word in his films, and "The Day the Niggaz Took Over."
3.
See my article " The Meaning of the Blues" for a discussion of how this concept works in contemporary culture.

Check Yo Self Before You Wreck Yo Self
TWO
1.
Texts devoted to analyzing rap music and contemporary culture have been appearing with increasing regularity, especially in light of past omissions. For instance, academic texts such as Houston Baker Jr.'s Rap Music, Black Studies, and the Academy, Tricia Rose's book Black Noise: Rap Music and Black Culture in Contemporary America, and a large segment of Gina Dent's edited volume Black Popular Culture are devoted to the subject. In addition, Nelson George, whose work on rap is largely chronicled in Buppies, B-Boys, BAPS, and Bohos, and Greg Tate , author of Flyboy in the Buttermilk, both former Village Voice writers, have gained increased attention as authorities in this regard. The popularity of magazines such as The Source and Vibe adds to this recent phenomenon.
2.
For an extended explanation of the "death of politics" relative to popular culture, see my analysis of Spike Lee's Malcolm X, "Popular Culture and Political Empowerment," in the Cineaste critical symposium on the same subject.

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