Measuring Health-Related Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents: Implications for Research and Practice

By Dennis Drotar | Go to book overview
Save to active project

PART IV
METHODS, MEASURES, AND APPLICATION OF HRQOL ASSESSMENT IN CHILDREN WITH GROWTH AND ENDOCRINE PROBLEMS

The advances in medical technology that have enabled children with chronic conditions to live longer lives have also influenced changes in the utilization of treatments available for children with growth and endocrine problems. For example, in the past, only children with demonstrable growth hormone deficiency (GHD) received growth hormone (GH) treatment. The advent of bioengineered growth hormone has led to a dramatic increase in the number of children with short stature who are treated with GH. Some research on the psychosocial outcomes and adaptation of children with short stature has suggested that treatment is warranted in part because these children experience social problems, social isolation, negative self-concepts, and adjustment difficulties. Whereas the medical management of children with growth problems is often influenced, at least in part, by concerns about the psychosocial impact of being short on children's lives, the evaluation of the effects of treatment has been based on objective measures such as height, weight, or bone diameter, which do not consider the child or parents' perceptions of their quality of life (QOL). Consequently, the information obtained from HRQOL assessments of children with growth problems has considerable utility in making treatment decisions and in tracking the well-being of children treated with growth hormone. Several of the chapters in this section describe the uses and challenges involved in using HRQOL assessments of children with growth and endocrine problems.

In chapter 15, Wiklund and her colleagues describe factors relevant to the measurement of HRQOL in children and adolescents with growth problems, such as the influence of gender and age, and the impact of denial. This chapter evaluates the advantages and disadvantages of the methods, measures, and domains that are incorporated in assessments of the HRQOL of children with short stature, reviews current methods used to evaluate the effectiveness of GH therapy, and offers suggestions to maximize the utility of information about children's QOL in monitoring the consequences and efficacy of GH therapy for children with growth problems and improve the quality of research with this population.

Stabler and Frank (chapter 16) continue the discussion of the application of HRQOL concepts and measures in children treated with GH therapy. Their review of empirical studies regarding the psychosocial

-253-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Measuring Health-Related Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents: Implications for Research and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 378

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?