Shakespeare's Sexual Comedy: A Mirror for Lovers

By Hugh M. Richmond | Go to book overview

Early Warning

ALMOST the twin of my infant daughter, this book was conceived in a Paris flat on the Left Bank, which was soon to reverberate with the echoes of police batons hammering on student skulls and the crash of flying cobblestones. In due course it was born into a Berkeley clouded with tear gas, baptized on Telegraph Avenue in coffee shops flanked by the bayonets of the National Guard, and confirmed in university rooms sprinkled with broken glass or stained by arson attempts. Under the circumstances it is unlikely to prove just another academic book about Shakespeare. The old style of scholarship is manifestly failing to meet certain needs of modern society, while the demand of the young for relevance has led them to reject all but last week's leaders (even Mario Savio looks a bit lonely sitting over there in Cody's bookstore). I find myself dissatisfied with both conventional views; some new synthesis is needed. I am almost tempted to exorcise the demon Confrontation by invoking that fishy British word: Compromise.

A "classic" author who cannot help us to live better now has little claim on our attention; but if there really are any serious young people naive enough to insist that no one over thirty ever said anything relevant to the feelings of the present generation, someone needs to remind them that they are rejecting the only means that will make their aim of cultural reconstruction possible. At least the progressives' need of tradition should be on record. The trouble with most revolutions is that their initiators usually fail to recognize that the word implies a return to where one started (Charles II replaces Cromwell; Louis XVIII, Napoleon;

-i-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Shakespeare's Sexual Comedy: A Mirror for Lovers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 210

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.