The Developments of Congressional Investigative Power

By M. Nelson McGeary | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI
CONCERNING FUTURE METHODS

CONGRESSIONAL investigations are useful cogs in the wheels of the American system of government. Each general function of Congress is more effectively performed as a result of the facts which are gleaned by inquiring committees. There are abuses, however. Indeed, so intermingled are the misuses and the benefits of the inquiries that extreme praise of or vituperation against investigations as a whole, if made in good faith, hardly reflects more than a patchwork knowledge of them. More significant than the mere presence of the abuses, however, is the inescapable conclusion that—again speaking generally—little has been accomplished by way of correction in a score of years. The absence of improvement must bring a feeling of discouragement to persons who are interested in efficient governmental processes.

There have been shining examples of investigations of the better type; the Pecora-Fletcher inquiry into the stock exchanges and banking may be cited as only one—its legislative results and its accomplishments in moulding public opinion speak for themselves. Perhaps an equal number of inquiries, however, have injured the prestige of Congressional investigating. These mismanaged investigations — present in each Congress—have an important share in contributing to the ridicule which many inquiries receive from the general public and to which previous writers have referred. 1 It is difficult to judge whether this ridicule has increased or decreased during the past decade. There seems to be little basis, however, for concluding that it has subsided to any appreciable degree. The scoffing is admittedly fostered in part by those persons who are seeking defenses against damaging revelations made by the committees. Moreover, the significance of a particular inquiry may be blurred for the man on the street because the press frequently

____________________
1
Dimock, op. cit., p. 170.

-115-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Developments of Congressional Investigative Power
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Developments of Congressional Investigative Power *
  • Preface *
  • Contents 5
  • Chapter I Introductory 7
  • Chapter II Purposes of Investigations 23
  • Chapter III Procedure 50
  • Chapter IV Results 85
  • Chapter V Recent Decisions by the Courts 95
  • Chapter VI Concerning Future Methods 115
  • Bibliography 161
  • Index 167
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 172

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.