Horace Greeley, Nineteenth-Century Crusader

By Glyndon G. Van Deusen | Go to book overview

Acknowledgment

This book has been six years in preparation, and during that time I have received aid and encouragement from many quarters. It is with particular gratitude that I acknowledge my obligations to the Albert J. Beveridge Memorial Fund Committee, both for its criticisms of the manuscript and for permission to delay its publication a year so that I might accept a Fulbright Award as lecturer in American history in New Zealand; to Dexter Perkins, whose interest in productive scholarship has been manifested, as always, by encouragement and constructive advice; to the University of Rochester for a generous leave of absence that was all-important to the progress of the book; to Paul Wallace Gates, who read nearly half of the manuscript and whose advice and criticism did not go unheeded.

I wish to render full acknowledgment to the Boston Public Library for permission to quote the letter from Greeley to Rufus W. Griswold that is printed in chapter eleven; to Holman Hamilton for the loan of manuscript materials and even more for his friendly encouragement and support; to Roger Butterfield for encouragement and for the loan of valuable materials; to Edward C. M. Stahl for use of the letter books in the Henry A. Stahl Collection; to J. H. Cramer for letters and newspaper items concerning Greeley; to Miss Irene Neu for material on Greeley that she discovered during her own historical research; to Mrs. Edith M. Fox for aid in the use of the Greeley materials in the Collection of Regional History at Cornell University; to Edward Hubler for a Dickens item on Clay; to G. P. Putnam's Sons for permission to quote Walt Whitman's "For You O Democracy" from their COMPLETE WRITINGS OF WALT WHITMAN; to James A. Rawley for information in regard to the Morgan Papers; to Richard Lowitt for suggestions as to source materials; to Paul Adams, Herbert Bass, Don Bensch, Thomas Bonner, Chandler Bragdon, Donald Disbrow, David Leach, Cecelia Koretsky Michael, David Smith, James Stevenson, and Robert Tolf, graduate students who did research under my direction; to Robert W. Hill, Keeper of the Manuscripts in the New York Public Library, for his generous and unstinting aid; to John R. Russell, Librarian of the University of Rochester, for the greatest possible cooperation in this enterprise; to Margaret Butterfield, Archivist of Rhees Library at the University of Rochester, for efficient help, most generously given.

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Horace Greeley, Nineteenth-Century Crusader
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Horace Greeley - Nineteenth-Century Crusader *
  • Dorace Greeley - Nineteenth-Century Crusader *
  • Acknowledgment *
  • Contents *
  • Illustrations *
  • Dorace Greeley - Nineteenth-Century Crusader *
  • Prologue *
  • Chapter 1 - Youth of a Yankee *
  • Chapter 2 - The Slopes of Parnassus *
  • Chapter 3 - A Budding Politician *
  • Chapter 4 - A Bride and an Alliance *
  • Chapter 5 - Microcosms *
  • Chapter 6 - This Brave New World *
  • Chapter 7 - Not So Brave and Not So New *
  • Chapter 8 - Soundings *
  • Chapter 9 - The Crystallization of a "Liberal" Program *
  • Chapter 10 - A Strong-Minded Adjutant *
  • Chapter 11 - Crisis and Schism *
  • Chapter 12 - The Greeleys at Home *
  • Chapter 13 - Interlude *
  • Chapter 14 - A Disruption of Partnerships *
  • Chapter 15 - A Republican Operator *
  • Chapter 16 - Greeley's Battle *
  • Chapter 17 - A Demonstration of Independence *
  • Chapter 18 - A Nationalist at Bay *
  • Chapter 19 - Windswept *
  • Chapter 20 - Storm-Tossed *
  • Chapter 21 - "For You O Democracy" *
  • Chapter 22 - Pursuit of the Dream *
  • Chapter 23 - Valiant Battle *
  • Chapter 24 - And Still the Quest *
  • Chapter 25 - The End of the Rainbow *
  • Epilogue *
  • Bibliography *
  • Index *
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