Horace Greeley, Nineteenth-Century Crusader

By Glyndon G. Van Deusen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 15
A Republican Operator

KANSAS WAS FUEL TO THE FLAME OF ANTISLAVERY excitement, and Greeley used that fuel to the best advantage. The Tribune's portrayal of the free-soil and proslavery forces contending for the possession of Kansas was etched in black and white. The slaveholding Missourians who crossed over into the territory were "Border Ruffians," men who believed only in the law of the rifle and the bowie knife, men who were bent upon committing mayhem and murder. The proslavery Kansas settlers were a plundering, shooting, burning, torturing, tobacco-chewing, whiskey-drinking set, who would as soon shoot a Free-soiler as to look at him. They had an irresistible penchant for violence and tumult. The Free-soilers, on the other hand, were honest, industrious, and God-fearing. They were interested only in their work, their homes, and freedom. Their whole disposition was to remain quiet, avoid collisions, and pursue their farming, resisting only as a last resort the outrages inflicted upon them. 1

Actually, the settlers, whether slaveholders or Free-soilers, were fairly similar as to character and temperament, but there was little indication of this in the pages of the Tribune.

Greeley beat the drum for free soil in Kansas, but he made it clear that this was by no means his ultimate goal. For the moment, he was fighting a defensive battle against slavery extension. This was all that was now practicable, in view of the attitude of the great majority of American citizens. But the final aim was the elimination of a great social evil. With that end in view (an end that was to be accomplished, where slavery already existed, through social pressure and education rather than by political action), he was seeking to develop and ripen public sentiment in favor of a general emancipation. His campaign against slavery was not based so much upon truth as upon moral considerations.

It was in keeping with this idea of a steady advance toward the

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Horace Greeley, Nineteenth-Century Crusader
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Horace Greeley - Nineteenth-Century Crusader *
  • Dorace Greeley - Nineteenth-Century Crusader *
  • Acknowledgment *
  • Contents *
  • Illustrations *
  • Dorace Greeley - Nineteenth-Century Crusader *
  • Prologue *
  • Chapter 1 - Youth of a Yankee *
  • Chapter 2 - The Slopes of Parnassus *
  • Chapter 3 - A Budding Politician *
  • Chapter 4 - A Bride and an Alliance *
  • Chapter 5 - Microcosms *
  • Chapter 6 - This Brave New World *
  • Chapter 7 - Not So Brave and Not So New *
  • Chapter 8 - Soundings *
  • Chapter 9 - The Crystallization of a "Liberal" Program *
  • Chapter 10 - A Strong-Minded Adjutant *
  • Chapter 11 - Crisis and Schism *
  • Chapter 12 - The Greeleys at Home *
  • Chapter 13 - Interlude *
  • Chapter 14 - A Disruption of Partnerships *
  • Chapter 15 - A Republican Operator *
  • Chapter 16 - Greeley's Battle *
  • Chapter 17 - A Demonstration of Independence *
  • Chapter 18 - A Nationalist at Bay *
  • Chapter 19 - Windswept *
  • Chapter 20 - Storm-Tossed *
  • Chapter 21 - "For You O Democracy" *
  • Chapter 22 - Pursuit of the Dream *
  • Chapter 23 - Valiant Battle *
  • Chapter 24 - And Still the Quest *
  • Chapter 25 - The End of the Rainbow *
  • Epilogue *
  • Bibliography *
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 445

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.