William H. Seward's Travels around the World

By Olive Risley Seward; William Henry Seward | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV.
CALCUTTA (Continued).

The Maharajah of Putteeala.--Oriental Magnificence.--Kali Ghaut.--The Temple.--Hindoo Idols.--Kali.--Siva.--A Mohammedan Mosque.--The Reading of the Budget.-- Indian Finances.--The King of Oude.--The Prince of Oude.

March 9th.--The fashionable promenade of Calcutta is the public garden, which is named Eden. The name, however, is not borrowed from paradise, as might be supposed, but was bestowed in compliment to the Hon. Miss Eden, the accomplished sister of Earl Godolphin Osborne, a former governor-general. We visited this garden yesterday with Lady Mayo, at sunset, for evening begins at sunset here. Brilliant gas-lights sparkling through & dark foliage of mango, palm, and cypress trees, with music from a central stand beneath them, lent their strong attractions. It was a gay scene. We walked on the green lawns, and for an hour listened to the music, surrounded by beautiful English ladies dressed from boxes just out from London and Paris; happy children glad of release from confinement of nurses and school-room, chasing each other over the lawns; army-officers in full-dress for dinner or the opera; stately baboos in white cambric; dusky Sepoy guards in white-and-red uniforms; rajahs in jewelled turbans and goldembroidered robes; and, in the back-ground, parsees, in their funnel hats, were seen in earnest converse. Mohammedans on their knees, with faces toward Mecca, were repeating their prayers. His highness the Maharajah of Putteeala, of Northern India, was one

-388-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
William H. Seward's Travels around the World
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 788

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.