William H. Seward's Travels around the World

By Olive Risley Seward; William Henry Seward | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII.
ALLAHABAD, LUCKNOW, AND AGRA.

Allahabad, the City of God.-- Cawnpore.--Lucknow, the Capital of Oude.--Extent of the Country.--Arrival at Agra.--A Marvellous Monument of Arms, Arts, and Empire.-- Akbar the Great.--His Vast Architectural Works.--The Pearl Mosque.--Futtehpore Sikra.--Its Great Wall.--The Tomb of Sheik Selim Chishti.--The Panch Mahal.--Akbar's Tomb.--His Wealth.--His Horses and his Elephants.--Weighing his Presents.

March 18th.--Allahabad (the city of God), once a Mohammedan town, has now relapsed to the religion of Bramah. It stands on the Jumna, just above its confluence with: the Ganges. It derives its present importance from its beings the place of junction for the railroads of Northern India with the main eastern and western line, which connects Bombay and Calcutta. The railroad bridge across the Jumna is celebrated throughout the world. Allahabad is a large military station, and the capital of the northwestern provinces. It has a public garden, which receives a pictiuresque effect from two massive Mohammedan tomba or imambarras.

We were met at the station, at ten o'clock last night, by an officer, and conducted to Government House, the residence of the governor, Sir William Muir. This spacious and elegant structure was illuminated for a concert. Hospitality attended with less ostentation, or a more sympathetic kindness, we have never known. Sir William and Lady Muir not only believe in works of education, but they are patrons of the "Woman's Union Society of America." A sudden indisposition prevented Mr. Seward's attendance at a dinner made for him by the United

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