William H. Seward's Travels around the World

By Olive Risley Seward; William Henry Seward | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X.
DELHI, THE MOGUL CAPITAL.

A Vivid Contrast to Agra.--Ludlow Castle.--Brief Sketch of Hindoo History.--The Persians.--The Greeks.--The Arabs.--Sultan Mahmoud.--The Mongols or Moguls.-- Foundation of Delhi.--Successive Changes of Site.--The Kootub Minar.--A Singular Iron Shaft.--The Mogul Tombs.--The Tomb of Jehanara.--The Jumna Musjid.-- The Imperial Palace.--Farewell to Delhi.

Ludlow Castle, Delhi, March 26th.--In crossing the Jumna, the citadel of Delhi seems to be directly over the terminus of the railroad-bridge, and gives a fine effect to the approach. As first seen, Delhi is a vivid contrast to Agra. Akbar wedded Agra, and died--like the Hindoo widow, she has faithfully mourned him in decline and poverty ever since. Delhi, until recently the capital of the Mogul dynasty, and since an important seat of British rule, is a fickle jade, who transferred her allegiance. We entered by the Cashmere gate, and, driving over a broad plain, in which fine European buildings alternate with highly-cultivated gardens, we reached Ludlow Castle, where we are the guests of the civil commiosioner of the district, Colonel Young.

The outside world derived its earliest knowledge of India from its neighbors, the Persians, who maintained a vigorous commerce with Greece in the time of Darius. They gave to the country its name of Hindostan, the land of the black men. There still remain in the Andaman Islands, and some other parts of India, tribes of savages, who are supposed to be derived from an aboriginal race which possessed the country before the Hindoos. However that

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