Reading Nathalie Sarraute: Dialogue and Distance

By Emer O'Beirne | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I owe a debt of gratitude to several people and institutions for help in the writing of this study. The D.Phil. thesis on which it is based was supervised by Ann Jefferson ( New College, Oxford), for whose encouragement and critical interest I am very grateful. Nathalie Sarraute was kind enough to accord me interviews on two occasions. Jean-Yves Tadié ( University of Paris IV) also provided guidance in the early stages, especially regarding my work on irony. Celia Britton and Rhiannon Goldthorpe made valuable comments on the original thesis, while Ronald Truman and the reader of the Oxford Monographs Committee gave time and energy to overseeing revisions. Malcolm Bowie generously read part of the manuscript. The editorial team at Oxford University Press handled the publication process with care and efficiency. In addition, I have received constant support and advice over the years from Barbara Wright of Trinity College Dublin, as well as from other former teachers at Trinity, most notably Eda Sagarra.

I am extremely grateful to the Pirie-Reid Fund ( Oxford) which awarded me a three-year postgraduate research scholarship, and to Trinity College Dublin for previously awarding me a Hutchinson Stewart Literary Scholarship. In addition, a bursary from the Oxford-Paris Exchange Programme facilitated research in Paris, as, more recently, did a travel subsidy from Exeter University French Department.

Many thanks to Serge Cohen for kindly granting me permission to reproduce the photograph of Nathalie Sarraute on the cover of this book, and also to Gallimard for permission to reprint passages from Sarraute's works.

Friends and colleagues from Oxford, Paris, Exeter, Dublin, and elsewhere have consistently given help, encouragement, advice, and light relief. Special thanks are due to the following who read parts of the manuscript, tracked down references, photocopied inaccessible articles, or otherwise provided invaluable practical help: Keith Cameron, Stephen Colvin, Emma Kell, Kathleen Micham, Anne Mullen, Maria Sherwood-Smith, Douglas Smith, Sheila Watts, Andrea Williams.

-v-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reading Nathalie Sarraute: Dialogue and Distance
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements v
  • Contents vii
  • Abbreviations viii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1- Irony, Dialogue, and the Novel 10
  • 2- The Writing Self: Irony And Authority 49
  • 3- The Self and Language: Authenticity and Convention 93
  • 4- Reading and Otherness 137
  • 5- Reading in Theory and Practice 181
  • Conclusion Ici-From Language to Silence And Back 221
  • Bibliography 236
  • Index 255
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 266

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.