Proceedings of the Sixteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society: August 13-16, 1994, Cognitive Science Program, Georgia Institute of Technology

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Proceedings of the Sixteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society

Edited by Ashwin Ram and Kurt Eiselt

August 13 to 16, 1994

Georgia Institute of Technology

LAWRENCE ERLBAUM ASSOCIATES, PUBLISHERS

1994 Hillsdale, New Jersey

Hove, UK

-i-

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Proceedings of the Sixteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society: August 13-16, 1994, Cognitive Science Program, Georgia Institute of Technology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Table of Contents iii
  • The Sixteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society xi
  • Electronic Index Access Information xii
  • Preface xiii
  • Reviewers xv
  • Refereed Papers 1
  • Distribution and Frequency: Modelling the Effects of Speaking Rate on Category Boundaries Using a Recurrent Neural Network 3
  • Abstract 3
  • Introduction 3
  • Conclusion 8
  • Acknowledgements 8
  • References 8
  • Causal Attribution as Mechanism-Based Story Construction: An Explanation of the Conjunction Fallacy and the Discounting Principle 9
  • Abstract 9
  • Introduction 9
  • Conclusion 13
  • Acknowledgements 13
  • References 14
  • Mental Models in Propositional Reasoning 15
  • Abstract 15
  • Conclusion 20
  • Acknowledgements 20
  • References 20
  • Combining Simulative and Metaphor-Based Reasoning About Beliefs 21
  • Abstract 21
  • Concluding Remarks 26
  • Acknowledgements 26
  • References 26
  • Artificial Evolution of Syntactic Aptitude 27
  • Abstract 27
  • Introduction 27
  • Acknowledgment 32
  • References 32
  • Interactive Model-Driven Case Adaptation for Instructional Software Design 33
  • Abstract 33
  • Introduction 33
  • Acknowledgments 37
  • References 37
  • Collaborative Explanations and Metacognition: Identifying Successful Learning Activities in the Acquisition of Cognitive Skills 39
  • Abstract 39
  • Introduction 39
  • Acknowledgements 43
  • References 43
  • Inducing Agrammatic Profiles in Normals 45
  • Abstract 45
  • Introduction 45
  • In Conclusion 49
  • References 49
  • Problem Content Affects the Categorization and Solutions of Problems 51
  • Abstract 51
  • Introduction 51
  • Appendix A 54
  • Appendix B 54
  • Acknowledgments 55
  • References 55
  • On the Psychological Basis for Rigid Designation 56
  • Abstract 56
  • Introduction 56
  • Acknowledgements 60
  • References 60
  • The Theory-Ladenness of Data: An Experimental Demonstration 61
  • Abstract 61
  • Introduction 61
  • Conclusions 64
  • References 64
  • Kant and Cognitive Science 66
  • Abstract 66
  • Conclusion 70
  • References 70
  • A Connectionist Model of the Development of Velocity, Time, and Distance Concepts 72
  • Abstract 72
  • Introduction 72
  • Acknowledgments 77
  • References 77
  • Connectionist Modelling of Spelling 78
  • Abstract 78
  • Introduction 78
  • References 83
  • Internal Representations of a Connectionist Model of Reading Aloud 84
  • Abstract 84
  • Introduction 84
  • Multiple Constraints in Syntactic Ambiguity Resolution: A Connectionist Account of Psycholinguistic Data 90
  • Abstract 90
  • Introduction 90
  • Acknowledgements 94
  • References 95
  • Parafoveal and Semantic Effects on Syntactic Ambiguity Resolution 96
  • Abstract 96
  • Introduction 96
  • Acknowledgements 99
  • References 99
  • Competing Models of Analogy: Acme Versus Copycat 100
  • Abstract 100
  • Introduction 100
  • Acknowledgments 105
  • References 105
  • Case Age: Selecting the Best Exemplars for Plausible Reasoning Using Distance in Time or Space 106
  • Abstract 106
  • Introduction 106
  • References 110
  • Acknowledgments 111
  • The Implications of Corrections: Then Why Did You Mention It? 112
  • Abstract 112
  • Conclusion 116
  • References 117
  • Integrating, Not Debating, Situated Action and Computational Models: Taking the Environment Seriously 118
  • Abstract 118
  • Introduction 118
  • Conclusions and Implications 122
  • Acknowledgments 123
  • References 123
  • Counterfactual Reasoning: Inferences from Hypothetical Conditionals 124
  • Abstract 124
  • References 129
  • Functional and Conditional Equivalence: Conceptual Contributions from Behavior Analysis 130
  • Abstract 130
  • Introduction: Equivalence Relations 130
  • Conclusion 134
  • Acknowledgments 135
  • References 135
  • Lexical Segmentation: the Role of Sequential Statistics in Supervised and Un-Supervised Models 136
  • Abstract 136
  • Introduction: the Segmentation Problem 136
  • Summary and Discussion 140
  • References 141
  • Taxonomy for Planned Reading 142
  • Abstract 142
  • Introduction 142
  • Conclusion 147
  • References 147
  • Segmenting Speech Without a Lexicon: Evidence for a Bootstrapping Model of Lexical Acquisition 148
  • Abstract 148
  • Introduction 148
  • Conclusions and Future Work 151
  • Modeling the Interaction Between Speech and Gesture 153
  • Abstract 153
  • Introduction 153
  • Conclusion 157
  • Acknowledgements 157
  • References 158
  • The Effects of Labels in Examples on Problem Solving Transfer 159
  • Abstract 159
  • Introduction 159
  • Acknowledgements 164
  • References 164
  • Sl: A Subjective, Intensional Logic of Belief 165
  • Abstract 165
  • Introduction 165
  • References 170
  • An Empirical Investigation of Law Encoding Diagrams for Instruction 171
  • Abstract 171
  • Introduction 171
  • Conclusions 176
  • Acknowledgements 176
  • References 176
  • Are Scientific Theories That Predict Data More Believable Than Theories That Retrospectively Explain Data? a Psychological Investigation 177
  • Abstract 177
  • Conclusions 182
  • Acknowledgments 182
  • References 182
  • The Architecture of Intuition: Converging Views from Physics Education and Linguistics 183
  • Abstract 183
  • Introduction 183
  • Conclusion 187
  • Acknowledgments 188
  • References 188
  • Commonsense Knowledge and Conceptual Structure in Container Metaphors 189
  • Abstract 189
  • Introduction 189
  • 3 Conclusion 194
  • References 194
  • A Descriptive Model of Question Asking During Story Acquisition Interviews 195
  • Abstract 195
  • Introduction 195
  • Acknowledgements 200
  • References 200
  • Imagistic Simulation and Physical Intuition in Expert Problem Solving 201
  • Abstract 201
  • Conclusion: Can Concrete Physical Intuitions and Simulations Play an Important Role in Expert Thinking? 205
  • Acknowledgments 205
  • References 205
  • Modelling Retroactive Context Effects in Spoken Word Recognition with a Simple Recurrent Network 207
  • Abstract 207
  • Conclusions 211
  • Acknowledgments 212
  • References 212
  • Individual Differences and Predictive Validity in Student Modeling 213
  • Abstract 213
  • Acknowledgement 218
  • References 218
  • Rational Choice and Framing Devices: Argumentation and Computer Programming 219
  • Abstract 219
  • Introduction 219
  • Conclusion 224
  • References 224
  • Machines That Forget: Learning from Retrieval Failure of Mis-Indexed Explanations 225
  • Abstract 225
  • Introduction 225
  • Conclusion 229
  • Acknowledgments 230
  • References 230
  • Failure-Driven Learning as Input Bias 231
  • Abstract 231
  • Introduction 231
  • Conclusions 235
  • Acknowledgments 236
  • References 236
  • Graphical Effects in Learning Logic: Reasoning, Representation and Individual Differences 237
  • Abstract 237
  • Acknowledgements 241
  • References 241
  • The Null List Strength Effect in Recognition Memory: Environmental Statistics and Connectionist Accounts 243
  • Abstract 243
  • Introduction 243
  • Acknowledgements 246
  • References 246
  • Effects of Collaborative Interaction and Computer Tool Use 248
  • Abstract 248
  • Acknowledgements 253
  • References 253
  • Learning from Instruction: A Comprehension-Based Approach 254
  • Abstract 254
  • Acknowledgments 259
  • References 259
  • The Effect of Syntactic Form on Simple Belief Revisions and Updates 260
  • Abstract 260
  • Introduction 260
  • Acknowledgments 265
  • References 265
  • Managing Disagreement in Intellectual Conversations: Coordinating Interpersonal and Conceptual Concerns in the Collaborative Construction of Mathematical Explanations 266
  • Abstract 266
  • Introduction 266
  • Acknowledgements 271
  • References 271
  • Natural Oculomotor Performance in Looking and Tapping Tasks 272
  • Abstract 272
  • Introduction 272
  • Conclusion 277
  • Acknowledgements 277
  • References 277
  • The Effect of Similarity on Memory for Prior Problems 278
  • Abstract 278
  • Acknowledgments 282
  • References 282
  • Magi: Analogy-Based Encoding Using Regularity and Symmetry 283
  • Abstract 283
  • Conclusion 288
  • Acknowledgments 288
  • References 288
  • The Construction-Integration Model: A Framework for Studying Context Effects in Sentence Processing 289
  • Abstract 289
  • Introduction 289
  • Conclusions 293
  • Acknowledgments 293
  • References 293
  • Context Effects in Syntactic Ambiguity Resolution: the Location of Prepositional Phrase Attachment 295
  • Abstract 295
  • Introduction 295
  • Acknowledgments 300
  • References 300
  • Distributional Bootstrapping: from Word Class to Proto-Sentence 301
  • Abstract 301
  • Introduction 301
  • References 305
  • Attention Allocation During Movement Preparation 307
  • Abstract 307
  • Introduction 307
  • Acknowledgements 311
  • References 311
  • Incremental Structure-Mapping 313
  • Abstract 313
  • 1. Introduction 313
  • Learning the Arabic Plural: the Case for Minority Default Mappings in Connectionist Networks. 319
  • Introduction: 319
  • Acknowledgments 323
  • Acknowledgments 323
  • Using Introspective Reasoning to Guide Index Refinement in Case-Based Reasoning 324
  • Introduction 324
  • Introduction 328
  • How Do Representations of Visual Form Organize Our Percepts of Visual Motion? 330
  • Introduction 330
  • Conclusions and Predictions 333
  • Acknowledgements 334
  • References 334
  • Dynamically Constraining Connectionist Networks to Produce Distributed, Orthogonal Representations to Reduce Catastrophic Interference 335
  • Introduction 335
  • Conclusions 339
  • Inference Processes in Speech Perception 341
  • Introduction 341
  • Conclusions 345
  • Acknowledgements 345
  • References 345
  • How Graphs Mediate Analog and Symbolic Representation 346
  • Introduction 346
  • Acknowledgments 350
  • References 350
  • The Coherence Imbalance Hypothesis: A Functional Approach to Asymmetry in Comparison 351
  • Summary 355
  • Acknowledgements 356
  • References 356
  • A Corpus Analysis of Recency Preference and Predicate Proximity 357
  • Introduction 357
  • Summary and Conclusions 361
  • Acknowledgements 361
  • References 361
  • Using Trajectory Mapping to Analyze Musical Intervals 363
  • Introduction 363
  • Conclusion 368
  • Acknowledgment 368
  • References 368
  • Are Children 'Lazy Learners'? a Comparison of Natural and Machine Learning of Stress 369
  • References 369
  • Conclusion 373
  • Acknowledgments 374
  • References 374
  • Array Representations for Model-Based Spatial Reasoning 375
  • References 375
  • Acknowledgements 380
  • References 380
  • Scientific Discovery in a Space of Structural Models: An Example from the History of Solution Chemistry 381
  • Introduction 381
  • Conclusion 386
  • References 386
  • Binding of Object Representations by Synchronous Cortical Dynamics Explains Temporal Order and Spatial Pooling Data 387
  • Introduction 387
  • Appendix: Details of the Model 390
  • Acknowledgements 390
  • Reference 390
  • Using Connectionist Networks to Examine the Role of Prior Constraints in Human Learning 392
  • Introduction 392
  • Conclusions 395
  • References 396
  • Objects, Actions, Nouns, and Verbs 397
  • Introduction 397
  • Conclusion 401
  • References 402
  • Empirical Evidence Regarding the Folk Psychological Concept of Belief 403
  • Introduction 403
  • Conclusions 408
  • Acknowledgements 408
  • References 408
  • Psychological Evidence for Assumptions of Path-Based Inheritance Reasoning 409
  • Introduction 409
  • Acknowledgements 414
  • References 414
  • Abstraction of Sensory-Motor Features 415
  • Conclusion 419
  • References 420
  • References 420
  • Wanderecho: A Connectionist Simulation of Limited Coherence 421
  • Introduction 421
  • Discussion and Conclusions 425
  • Acknowledgments 425
  • References 425
  • Proverb-- a System Explaining Machine-Found Proofs 427
  • Introduction 427
  • Conclusion 431
  • Acknowledgments 432
  • References 432
  • Mapping Hierarchical Structures with Synchrony for Binding: Preliminary Investigations 433
  • Introduction 433
  • Acknowledgments 438
  • References 438
  • References 438
  • The Curtate Cycloid Illusion: Cognitive Constraints on the Processing of Rolling Motion 439
  • References 444
  • Acknowledgements 444
  • Direct and Indirect Measures of Implicit Learning 445
  • References 450
  • References 450
  • Computational Simulation of Depth Perception in the Mammalian Visual System 451
  • Introduction 451
  • Acknowledgments 461
  • References 461
  • A Computational Model of Human Abductive Skill and Its Acquisition 463
  • Introduction 463
  • Conclusion 468
  • Acknowledgements 468
  • References 468
  • Bottom-Up Recognition Learning: A Compilation-Based Model of Limited-Lookahead Learning 469
  • Introduction 469
  • Conclusion 473
  • Acknowledgements 474
  • References 474
  • When 'Or' Means 'And': A Study in Mental Models 475
  • Introduction 475
  • Conclusions 478
  • Acknowledgements 478
  • References 478
  • Adaptive Learning of Gaussian Categories Leads to Decision Bounds and Response Surfaces Incompatible with Optimal Decision Making 479
  • Introduction 479
  • Conclusion 484
  • References 484
  • Coping with the Complexity of Design: Avoiding Conflicts and Prioritizing Constraints 485
  • Introduction 485
  • Acknowledgments 489
  • References 489
  • Adaptation as a Selection Constraint on Analogical Mapping 490
  • Introduction 490
  • Semantics and Pragmatics of Vague Probability Expressions 496
  • Conclusion 501
  • Acknowledgements 501
  • References 501
  • The Context-Sensitive Cognitive Architecture Dual 502
  • 6. Conclusions 506
  • Acknowledgements 506
  • References 506
  • The Origin of Clusters in Recurrent Neural Network State Space 508
  • Introduction 508
  • Introduction 512
  • Introduction 512
  • Learning of Rules That Have High-Frequency Exceptions: New Empirical Data and a Hybrid Connectionist Model 514
  • Introduction 514
  • Introduction 518
  • Categorization, Typicality, and Shape Similarity 520
  • Introduction 520
  • Recurrent Natural Language Parsing 525
  • Introduction 525
  • Acknowledgements 530
  • References 530
  • Levels of Semantic Constraint and Learning Novel Words 531
  • Models of Metrical Structure in Music 537
  • Introduction 537
  • Conclusions 541
  • Acknowledgments 542
  • References 542
  • Simulating Similarity-Based Retrieval: A Comparison of Arcs and Mac/Fac 543
  • 1. Introduction 543
  • 1. Introduction 548
  • 1. Introduction 548
  • 1. Introduction 548
  • Towards a Computer Model of Memory Search Strategy Learning 549
  • Introduction 549
  • Conclusions 553
  • Acknowledgements 553
  • Error Modeling in the Act-R Production System 555
  • Conclusion 559
  • Acknowledgments 559
  • References 559
  • Priming, Perceptual Reversal, and Circular Reaction in a Neural Network Model of Schema-Based Vision 560
  • Introduction 560
  • Acknowledgements 565
  • References 565
  • Variation in Unconscious Lexical Processing: Education and Experience Make a Difference 566
  • Acknowledgements 570
  • References 571
  • Understanding Diagrammatic Demonstrations 572
  • Introduction 572
  • Acknowledgements 576
  • References 576
  • Predicting Irregular Past Tenses Comparing Symbolic and Connectionist Models Against Native English Speakers 577
  • Introduction 577
  • Conclusion 582
  • Acknowledgements 582
  • Reference 582
  • Distributed Meeting Scheduling 583
  • Introduction 583
  • Conclusions 588
  • Acknowledgements 588
  • References 588
  • Uniform Representations for Syntax-Semantics Arbitration 589
  • Introduction 589
  • Conclusion 593
  • References 594
  • Acoustic-Based Syllabic Representation and Articulatory Gesture Detection: Prerequisites for Early Childhood Phonetic and Articulatory Development 595
  • References 600
  • Lexical Disambiguation Based on Distributed Representations of Context Frequency 601
  • Introduction 602
  • Conclusion 605
  • References 606
  • Time as Phase: A Dynamic Model of Time Perception 607
  • Introduction 607
  • Conclusions 612
  • Acknowledgments 612
  • References 612
  • Letter Perception: Toward a Conceptual Approach 613
  • Conclusion 618
  • References 618
  • Towards a New Model of Phonological Encoding 619
  • Acknowledgements 623
  • References 623
  • How Mathematicians Prove Theorems 624
  • Introduction 624
  • Conclusions 628
  • References 628
  • Scaffolding Effective Problem Solving Strategies in Interactive Learning Environments 629
  • Introduction 629
  • Conclusions 633
  • Acknowledgments 633
  • References 633
  • Modeling Inter-Category Typicality Within a Symbolic Search Framework 635
  • Introduction 635
  • Acknowledgements 639
  • References 639
  • Mental Models for Proportional Reasoning 640
  • Conclusion 645
  • References 645
  • Integrating Creativity and Reading: A Functional Approach 646
  • Introduction 646
  • Acknowledgements 651
  • References 651
  • A Study of Diagrammatic Reasoning from Verbal and Gestural Data 652
  • Introduction 652
  • Integrating Cognitive Capabilities in a Real-Time Task 658
  • Introduction 658
  • Conclusions 661
  • Acknowledgements 663
  • References 663
  • Can Connectionist Models Exhibit Non-Classical Structure Sensitivity? 664
  • Introduction 664
  • Conclusion 668
  • Acknowledgments 669
  • References 669
  • Cognitive Development and Infinity in the Small: Paradoxes and Consensus 670
  • Introduction 670
  • Changing the Viewpoint: Re-Indexing by Introspective Questioning 675
  • The Power of Negative Thinking: the Central Role of Modus Tollens in Human Cognition 681
  • Acknowledgement 686
  • References 686
  • Similarity by Feature Creation: Reexamination of the Asymmetry of Similarity 687
  • Introduction 687
  • A Connectionist Account of Global Precedence: Theory and Data 693
  • Introduction: Global Precedence 693
  • Acknowledgements 698
  • References 698
  • Modeling the Use of Frequency and Contextual Biases in Sentence Processing 699
  • Introduction 699
  • Correspondences Between Syntactic Form and Meaning: from Anarchy to Hierarchy 705
  • Introduction 705
  • Conclusion 710
  • References 710
  • Ka: Situating Natural Language Understanding in Design Problem Solving 711
  • Introduction 711
  • Acknowledgements 716
  • References 716
  • References 716
  • Categorization and the Parsing of Objects 717
  • Introduction 717
  • Conclusions 721
  • Acknowledgements 722
  • References 722
  • Strong Systematicity Within Connectionism: the Tensor-Recurrent Network 723
  • Introduction 723
  • Concluding Remarks 726
  • Acknowledgments 727
  • References 727
  • A Simple Co-Occurrence Explanation for the Development of Abstract Letter Identities 728
  • Acknowledgements 731
  • References 731
  • References 732
  • Probabilistic Reasoning Under Ignorance 733
  • Introduction 733
  • Acknowledgments 738
  • References 738
  • Troubleshooting Strategies in a Complex, Dynamical Dom Ain 739
  • Introduction 739
  • Conclusion 743
  • Acknowledgements 743
  • Acknowledgements 744
  • The Guessing Game: A Paradigm for Artificial Grammar Learning 745
  • Introduction 745
  • Introduction 746
  • Acknowledgements 749
  • References 749
  • Educational Implications of Celia: Learning by Observing and Explaining 750
  • Introduction 750
  • Summary 755
  • Acknowledgements 755
  • References 755
  • Improving Design with Artifact History 756
  • Introduction 756
  • Conclusion 760
  • Acknowledgements 760
  • References 760
  • Explanatory Ai, Indexical Reference, and Perception 762
  • Learning Features of Representation in Conceptual Context 766
  • Introduction 766
  • References 771
  • On-Line Versus Off-Line Priming of Word-Form Encoding in Spoken Word Production 772
  • References 772
  • Do Children Have Epistemic Constructs About Explanatory Frameworks: Examples from Naive Ideas About the Origin of Species 778
  • Do Children Have Epistemic Constructs About Explanatory Frameworks: Examples from Naive Ideas About the Origin of Species 778
  • Introduction Naive Theories and Conceptual Change 783
  • A Connectionist Model of Verb Subcategorization 784
  • References 784
  • Conclusion 788
  • References 788
  • Viewpoint Dependence and Face Recognition 789
  • Introduction 789
  • References 792
  • Acknowledgments 792
  • Multiple Learning Mechanisms Within Implicit Learning 794
  • Multiple Learning Mechanisms Within Implicit Learning 794
  • References 798
  • Learning with Friends and Foes 800
  • Introduction 800
  • Conclusions 804
  • Situated Cognition: Empirical Issue, 'Paradigm Shift' or Conceptual Confusion? 806
  • Introduction: Paradigm Shift? 806
  • Introduction: Paradigm Shift? 810
  • Introduction: Paradigm Shift? 811
  • Immediate Effects of Discourse and Semantic Context in Syntactic Processing: Evidence from Eye-Tracking 812
  • Introduction 812
  • Tractable Learning of Probability Distributions Using the Contrastive Hebbian Algorithm 818
  • Abstract 818
  • Conclusions 823
  • References 823
  • A Unified Model of Preference and Recovery Mechanisms in Human Parsing 824
  • Introduction 824
  • References 829
  • References 829
  • Pclearn: A Model for Learning Perceptual-Chunks 830
  • Introduction 830
  • Conclusion 834
  • Acknowledgements 834
  • Toward a Theoretical Account of Strategy Use and Sense-Making in Mathematics Problem Solving 836
  • Introduction 836
  • Conclusion 840
  • Acknowledgement 840
  • References 840
  • References 841
  • How Does an Expert Use a Graph? a Model of Visual and Verbal Inferencing in Economics 842
  • Introduction 842
  • Conclusion 845
  • Acknowledgements 845
  • References 845
  • References 848
  • References 848
  • References 852
  • Acknowledgements 853
  • References 853
  • Formal Rationality and Limited Agents 854
  • Introduction 854
  • Conclusion 857
  • Acknowledgements 857
  • References 857
  • Limiting Nested Beliefs in Cooperative Dialogue 858
  • Introduction 858
  • Conclusion 863
  • Acknowledgements 863
  • References 863
  • Functional Parts 864
  • Acknowledgments 869
  • References 869
  • Synchronous Firing Variable Binding is a Tensor Product Representation with Temporal Role Vectors 870
  • Conclusion 873
  • References 874
  • References 875
  • Simulated Perceptual Grouping: An Application to Human-Computer Interaction 876
  • Introduction 876
  • Conclusion 881
  • Acknowledgments 881
  • References 881
  • Exploiting Problem Solving to Select Information to Include in Dialogues Between Cooperating Agents 882
  • Introduction 882
  • Conclusion 886
  • Acknowledgements 886
  • References 886
  • Handling Unanticipated Events During Collaboration 887
  • Introduction 887
  • Introduction 891
  • Introduction 891
  • Introduction 893
  • Introduction 893
  • Introduction 893
  • Acknowledgements 898
  • Acknowledgements 898
  • References 899
  • References 899
  • References 899
  • Conclusions 903
  • Acknowledgments 904
  • Acknowledgments 904
  • Acknowledgements 909
  • References 909
  • Belief Modelling, Intentionality and Perlocution in Metaphor Comprehension 910
  • 1. Introduction 910
  • 7. Summary & Conclusions 915
  • References 915
  • References 916
  • References 921
  • Computing Goal Locations from Place Codes 922
  • Acknowledgements 926
  • References 926
  • Verb Inflections in German Child Language: A Connectionist Account 928
  • Conclusion 933
  • References 933
  • Analogical Transfer Through Comprehension and Priming 934
  • Analogical Transfer Through Comprehension and Priming 934
  • Introduction 939
  • Explaining Serendipitous Recognition in Design 940
  • Introduction 940
  • Introduction 945
  • Introduction 945
  • Abstract 946
  • Introduction 946
  • Conclusions 951
  • Acknowledgements 951
  • References 951
  • The Representation of Relational Information 952
  • The Representation of Relational Information 952
  • Acknowledgment 957
  • References 957
  • Invited Presentations 959
  • Observations from Studying Cognitive Systems in Context 961
  • References 963
  • A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words--But That's the Problem 965
  • The Role of Existing Knowledge in Generalization 966
  • Identifying the Modules of the Mind with Fmri: Imaging the Biological Stages in Visual and Language Processing 967
  • Symposium Cognitive Science Meets Cognitive Engineering 968
  • What Animal Cognition Tells Us About Human Cognition 973
  • Learning New Features of Representation 974
  • The Role of Cases in Learning 979
  • Abstract 979
  • References 979
  • Visual Reasoning in Discovery, Instruction and Problem Solving 980
  • Conclusion 983
  • Scientific Creativity: Multidisciplinary Perspectives 985
  • Introduction 988
  • Symposium on Collaborative Knowledge 990
  • Symposium on Collaborative Knowledge 990
  • Index 993
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