The Philadelphia Negro: A Social Study

By W. E. B. Du Bois | Go to book overview

APPENDIX B.
LEGISLATION, ETC., OF PENNSYLVANIA IN REGARD TO
THE NEGRO.

1682. Negro Serfdom Recognized . The charter of the Free Society of Traders of Pennsylvania recognizes the slavery of Blacks. Slaves were to be freed after fourteen years of service, upon condition that they cultivate land allotted to them, and surrender two-thirds of the produce annually.-- Hazard's "Annals" (Ed. 1850), 553.

1693, July 11. Tumults of Slaves . Action of City Council of Philadelphia against tumults by slaves.-- Penna. Col. Rec., I, 380-81.

1700. Slave Marriages . Penn proposes a bill regulating slave marriages; bill is lost in Council.--Bettle, 368; Thomas, 266.

1700, November 27. Trial of Slaves. "An Act for the Trial of Negroes." Introduced by Penn. This act provided that Negroes accused of high crime should be tried by two justices of the peace and six freeholders; rape of white women to be punished by death, and attempts by castration; Negroes were not to carry arms without special license; over four Negroes meeting together on Sundays or other days "upon no lawful business of their masters or owners" were to be whipped. -- Statutes-at-Large, ch. 56. (Disallowed January 7, 1706.)

1700, November 27. Traffic with Slaves . "An Act for the Better Regulation of Servants in this Province and Territories." Traffic with slaves forbidden, among other things.-- Statutesat-Large, ch. 49.

1700, November 27. Duty on Slaves . "An Act for Granting an Impost upon Wines, Rum, Beer, Ale, Cider, etc., Imported, Retorted and Sold in this Province and Territories." §2.... "for every Negro, male or female, imported, if above sixteen years of age, twenty shillings; for every Negro under the age of sixteen, six shillings.-- Statutes-at-Large, ch. 85.

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