A History of Canada - Vol. 2

By Gustave Lanctot; Margaret M. Cameron | Go to book overview

CHAPTER NINE
POLITICAL PROBLEMS AND ECONOMIC ACTIVITY
1685-1686

Denonville's mission: to subdue the Iroquois. Weakness of the country's defences. The essential danger: the English. Treaty between Versailles and London promises neutrality in America. Anglo-Iroquois intrigues. Fortification of the colony. Policing of the fur trade. Expedition of the Chevalier de Troyes to Hudson Bay. Canadian exploits. Seignelay's programme. Economic innovations of Intendant de Meulles. Efforts to assimilate the natives. Card money. Recall of de Meulles.

The new Governor, Jacques René de Brisay, Marquis de Denonville, was commissioned on January 1, 1685, and he disembarked in Quebec with his wife on August 1. As colonel of a regiment of dragoons, he had displayed the qualities of a brave soldier and an organizer who, though effective, was more methodical than farsighted. In spite of a certain lack of imagination, he certainly does not deserve the epithet "imbecile" which the acid pen of Saint-Simon attached to his name, and the disinterested integrity which he displayed during his period of administration was in sharp contrast with the mercenary preoccupations of Frontenac and La Barre. His wife, on the other hand, was said to have kept "in the Château St. Louis a room, one might almost say a shop, filled with merchandise." It was also said that she held raffles in order to get rid of her left-over stock. She was at the same time very pious and proper. 1

Denonville's first mission was to repair the mistakes of La Barre, and to ensure a solid peace by humiliating the pride of the Iroquois and protecting the Illinois and other friendly tribes. He had also to oppose any claims which the English might make on native or French lands. The tour of inspection which the Governor made as a first step in this difficult task revealed a deplorable

-93-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A History of Canada - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 289

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.