A History of Canada - Vol. 2

By Gustave Lanctot; Margaret M. Cameron | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FOURTEEN
THE GREAT IROQUOIS PEACE
AND THE CANADA COMPANY
1699-1703

Government of Callières. Conclusion of a general peace between French, Iroquois and Indian allies. Louvigny convicted of illicit trading. Antagonism between Callières and Champigny. Contraband fur and liquor traffic. Lamothe-Cadillac founds Detroit. Abuses of his administration. Failure of the Canada Company. Iroquois neutrality and the War of the Spanish Succession. Departure of Champigny and death of Callières.

On receiving the news of the death of Frontenac, Callières, who was ambitious to succeed him, sent Lieutenant Courtemanche on a secret mission to France by way of New York. Vaudreuil, who was also anxious to be appointed to the post, and who feared he might be the victim of "some Norman trick," sent the Sieur Vincelot to Paris by way of Pentagoët. Champigny was a third candidate. Courtemanche arrived in the capital a few hours before Vincelot, and delivered his letters to Count Callières "who went straight to the King to solicit the appointment for his brother, and the King granted his request." When Pontchartrain, after receiving the official dispatches of the two rivals, went to inform the King of the Governor's death, Louis XIV said that he had already received the news and that he had appointed Callières as Frontenac's successor. It was only just that he should do so. Callières's receptive intelligence, his perfect integrity and his military competence made him the best qualified of the three candidates, and the King recognized these qualities in the commission which he signed on April 20, 1699. Vaudreuil was granted as consolation the post of Governor of Montreal. 1

The first dispatch which Callières received from Versailles informed him that, as a result of the Treaty of Ryswick, all hostili

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